Tax Revolt: Something for Nothing in California

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Harvard University Press, 1982 - Law - 278 pages
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A tax revolt almost as momentous as the Boston Tea Party erupted in California in 1978. Its reverberations are still being felt, yet no one is quite sure what general lessons can be drawn from observing its course. this book is an in-depth study of this most recent and notable taxpayer's rebellion: Howard Jarvis and Proposition 13, the Gann measure of 1979, and Proposition (Jarvis II) of 1980.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
The History of the California Tax Revolt
19
Opinions about Taxes and Spending
43
The Vote and the Tax Revolt Schema
73
The Social Base
96
The ProRevolt Interests
111
The AntiRevolt Interests
142
Symbolic Predispositions
163
The Peculiar Election
188
Putting the Pieces Together
207
Comparisons and Implications
225
Appendix
245
Index
273
Copyright

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About the author (1982)

Professor of psychology and political science at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Nathaniel Persily is Professor of Law and Political Science at Columbia Law School. Jack Citrin is the Heller Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley. Patrick J. Egan is Assistant Professor of Politics at New York University.

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