The Botanical Magazine, Or, Flower-garden Displayed: In which the Most Ornamental Foreign Plants, Cultivated in the Open Ground, the Green-house, and the Stove, are Accurately Represented in Their Natural Colours ..., Volume 9 (Google eBook)

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s.n., 1795 - Botany
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Page 346 - It is a native of the Cape of Good Hope, from whence it was brought to Holland, and in 1692 it was cultivated at Hampton court. This plant is propagated by offsets, taken at the latter end of June, planted in separate pots, with light kitchen-garden earth, and placed in a shady situation.
Page 294 - ... Douglas devoted a whole work to the scientific treatment of this flower, from which we glean the following quaint description:—" Each flower when in its prime, looks like a fine gold tissue wrought on a rose-coloured ground ; but when it begins to fade and decay, looks more like a silver tissue on what they call a pink colour. When we look upon the flower in full sunshine, each leaf appears to be studded with thousands of little diamonds, sparkling and glittering with a most surprising, agreeable...
Page 320 - ... sent to Europe very soon after the discovery of this country. It was first sent to France by the French settlers in America. Over 250 years ago, (1629,) Parkinson* described and figured it from plants in cultivation in his garden at London and informs us that he received it from France. t He states, "it groweth neere the river of Canada, where the French plantation in America is seated.
Page 294 - Each flower, when in its prime, looks like a fine gold tissue worked on a rosecoloured ground; but when it begins to fade and decay, it looks more like a silver tissue, on what they call a pink colour. When we look upon the flower in full sunshine, each leaf appears to be studded with thousands of little diamonds, sparkling and glittering with...
Page 294 - Japan with some of the roots of this flower on board, was cast away upon the island of Guernsey; the roots were thrown upon a sandy shore, and so by the force of the winds and waves were soon buried in the sand. There they remained for some years, and afterwards, to the great surprise and admiration of the inhabitants, the flowers appeared in all their pomp and beauty.
Page 292 - We are happy in having it in our power to lay before our readers the following particular* from good authorityColonel Dcveaux is a native of SouthCarolina.
Page 351 - ... in its flowers, the petals being long, narrow, and pointed, and of a faffron colour, of a deeper tint when they firft open, and gradually changing to a pale yellow ; the beauty of 'the flowers is heightened by a glandular fubftance in the centre of each, •which when the flower expands is of a bright purple colour.
Page 305 - The spathe is composed of two leaves, which standing up at a certain period of the plant's flowering like ears, give to the whole flower a fancied resemblance...
Page 358 - It is a native of the Cape, and was introduced by Mr. MASSON in 1774*.
Page 327 - ... in pots ; and that, if it remains more than two years in the same spot, it degenerates, becomes less woody, and often wholly perishes ; that the Chinese, by whom it is held in high estimation, pay great attention to its culture.

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