Handbook of Children and the Media

Front Cover
Dorothy G. Singer, Jerome L. Singer
SAGE, 2001 - Psychology - 765 pages
3 Reviews

"A readable handbook that is certain to be an important resource for students, scholars, and researchers in a variety of disciplines."

CHOICE

From Internet censorship to levels of television exposure, the effects of mass media on children is one of the most widely debated issues in our society. Bringing together an interdisciplinary group of renowned scholars from around the world, the Handbook of Children and the Media is the first and only all-inclusive, comprehensive analysis of the field for students and scholars. This book summarizes the current scope of research on children and the media, suggests directions for future research, and attempts to provide students with a deliberate examination of how children use, enjoy, learn from, and are advantaged or disadvantaged by regular exposure to television and other electronic media.

The Handbook of Children and the Media is an outstanding text for classes and will provide students in communication, psychology, family studies, education, sociology, public policy, and related fields with a valuable reference work as they continue their studies in this important area. Beyond the classroom setting, policymakers, media professionals, and concerned parents will all find much to value in this landmark volume.

  

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Contents

The History of Childrens Use of Electronic Media
7
Implications for Child Development
29
The Use of Television and Other FilmRelated Media
47
Games and the Internet on Cognition Socialization and Behavior
73
COGNITIVE FUNCTIONS AND SCHOOLREADINESS SKILLS
101
Television and the Childs Developing Imagination
121
Television as Incidental Language Teacher
135
Creating Vigilance for Better Learning From Television
153
Forgins the Media Environment for
475
The Economic Structure of the Commercial Electronic
477
Broadcast Networks and the Childrens Television Business
495
Childrens Programming
507
PRIX JEUNESSE as a Force for Cultural Diversity
521
Gateway to Educational Resources
533
Children the Internet and Other New Technologies
547
Hazards and Possibilities of Commercial TV in the Schools
557

Prosocial Effects on Childrens Social Interactions
183
The Media and Childrens Fears Anxieties and Perceptions of Danger
207
Effects of Televised Violence on Aggression
223
A Global Study
255
What Do We Know About
269
PERSONALITY SOCIAL ATTITUDES AND HEALTH
309
Media and the Family
323
Televisions Gender Role Images and Contribution
341
Children and Television Advertising
375
Popular Music in Childhood and Adolescence
395
Children Adolescents Drugs and the Media
415
Targeting Children in a Toxic Environment
447
Television and Morality
463
The Role of Research in Educational Television
571
Policy Issues and Advocacy
587
Compliance With
605
Child and Parent Responses to the AgeBased
621
Government
651
Models and Monitors
663
Media Literacy and Critical Television Viewing in Education
681
A History and Analysis
699
A Final Word From the Editors
721
Index
727
About the Editors and Contributors
755
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Dorothy G. Singer, is retired Senior Research Scientist, Department of Psychology, Yale University. Dr. Singer is also Co-Director, with Jerome L. Singer, of the Yale University Family Television Research and Consultation Center affiliated with the Zigler Center for Child Development and Public Policy. She is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association. Her research and publications are in the area of early childhood development, television effects on youth, and parent training in imaginative play. She received the Distinguished Alumni Award from Teachers College, Columbia University in 2006, and in 2009, the Award for Distinguished Lifetime Contributions to Media Psychology from the American Psychological Association.

Jerome L. Singer is Professor Emeritus of Psychology at Yale University and a Fellow of the American Psychological Association. His specialty is research on the psychology of imagination and daydreaming. Dr. Singer has authored articles on thought processes, imagery, personality, psychotherapy, children's play, and the effects of television. He has been President of the Division of Aesthetics, Creativity and the Arts in the American Psychological Association. In 2008, he was awarded the Rudolf Arnheim Award for Distinguished Contributions to the Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts from the American Psychological Association, and in 2009, the Paul Farnsworth Award for Lifetime Contribution and Service, Division 10, American Psychological Association.

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