The Oregon Trail

Front Cover
Penguin, 1849 - Biography & Autobiography - 463 pages
18 Reviews
The Oregon Trail is the gripping account of Francis Parkman's journey west across North America in 1846. After crossing the Allegheny Mountains by coach and continuing by boat and wagon to Westport, Missouri, he set out with three companions on a horseback journey that would ultimately take him over two thousand miles. Map.
  

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Review: The Oregon Trail

User Review  - Khalekan - Goodreads

A book which started off well but became tedious over the last hundred pages as the author declared war on the buffalo population of the Great Plains. I kept hoping against hope that he would fall off ... Read full review

Review: The Oregon Trail

User Review  - Walter - Goodreads

When a college student returns to school for the fall, there are not many who could tell a better story about what he did for his summer vacation than Francis Parkman. In the spring to fall of 1846 ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

The Frontier
37
Breaking the Ice
46
Fort Leaven worth
58
Jumping Off
62
The Big Blue
75
The Platte and the Desert
95
The Buffalo
111
Taking French Leave
130
The Hunting Camp
275
The Trappers
301
The Black Hills
313
A Mountain Hunt
318
Passage of the Mountains
332
The Lonely Journey
352
The Pueblo and Bents Fort
375
Tete Rouge the Volunteer
384

Scenes at Fort Laramie
148
The War Parties
167
Scenes at the Camp
192
IllLuck
214
Hunting Indians
223
The Ogillallah Village
251
Indian Alarms
390
The Chase
403
The Buffalo Camp
414
Down the Arkansas
432
The Settlements
452
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About the author (1849)

Early in his youth, this Boston-born historian was infected with what he called (in language offensive to today's readers) "Injuns on the brain." For the rest of his life, he dedicated himself to writing what he had called at the age of 18 "a history of the American forest." In 1846, following the completion of his studies at Harvard College, he set out in company with a cousin on an expedition from St. Louis over the Oregon Trail to Fort Laramie, Wyoming, a journey that brought him into close contact with the Lakota Indians. Back in Boston, he turned the journal that he had kept on the trail into a series of sketches that were published in the Knickerbocker Magazine and afterwards as a book, The California and Oregon Trail, Being Sketches of Prairie and Rocky Mountain Life (1849), now better known by the abbreviated title of a later revised edition, The Oregon Trail. By this time, Parkman had well underway the historical work that would occupy him during the rest of his life, an account of the French and English in North America, the first installment of which was his History of the Conspiracy of Pontiac and the War of the North American Tribes against the English Colonies, published in 1851.

DAVID LEVIN earned his undergraduate degree in Roman and Greek civilization from the University of Michigan and is a graduate of Harvard Law School. He won a visiting scholar's fellowship at the American Academy in Rome and has practiced international law at Debevoise & Plimpton in New York. He lives in New York City.

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