Women, Death and Literature in Post-Reformation England

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Cambridge University Press, Jul 4, 2002 - History - 311 pages
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In Women, Death and Literature in Post-Reformation England Patricia Phillippy examines the crucial literal and figurative roles played by women in death and mourning during the early modern period. By examining early modern funerary, liturgical, and lamentational practices, as well as diaries, poems and plays, she illustrates the consistent gendering of rival styles of grief in post-Reformation England. Phillippy calls on a wide range of published and archival material that date from the Reformation to the seventeenth century, providing a study that will appeal to cultural and literary historians.
  

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Contents

A map of death
15
DISPOSING OF THE BODY
49
The body of history embalming and historiography in Shakespeares Henry VIII
54
Humility and stoutness the lives and deaths of Christian women
81
Londons mourning garment maternity mourning and succession in Shakespeares Richard III
109
SISTERS OF MAGDALENE
139
Imight againe have been the Sepulcure maternal mourning and the encrypted corpse
143
Quod licuit feci Elizabeth Russell and the power of public mourning
179
The matter of death the defense of Eve and the female ars moriendi
211
a web of blacke
242
Notes
247
Bibliography
284
Index
305
Copyright

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Page 2 - A' made a finer end and went away an it had been any christom child; a' parted even just between twelve and one, even at the turning o' the tide: for after I saw him fumble with the sheets and play with flowers and smile upon his fingers...
Page 2 - I, to comfort him, bid him a' should not think of God, I hoped there was no need to trouble himself with any such thoughts yet. So a' bade me lay more clothes on his feet: I put my hand into the bed and felt them, and they were as cold as any stone; then I felt to his knees, and so upward, and upward, and all was as cold as any stone.
Page 291 - Elizabeth by the Grace of God Queen of England France and Ireland Defender of the Faith &c.
Page 2 - ... the tide: for after I saw him fumble with the sheets and play with flowers and smile upon his fingers' ends, I knew there was but one way; for his nose was as sharp as a pen, and a* babbled of green fields.

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