Hyperion, illustr. from drawings by B. Foster (Google eBook)

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Page 177 - O, thou art fairer than the evening air Clad in the beauty of a thousand stars...
Page 240 - Here hung those lips that I have kissed I know not how oft. Where be your gibes now? your gambols? your songs? your flashes of merriment, that were wont to set the table on a roar?
Page 259 - He that hath found some fledged bird's nest may know, At first sight, if the bird be flown ; But what fair well or grove he sings in now, That is to him unknown.
Page 194 - Yet what binds us, friend to friend, But that soul with soul can blend ? Soul-like were those hours of yore ; Let us walk in soul once more ! "Take, O boatman, thrice thy fee ; Take, I give it willingly ; For, invisible to thee, Spirits twain have crossed with me ! " " O, that is beautiful, beautiful exceedingly ! Who translated it?
Page 197 - Virgin. 0, there is nothing holier, in this life of ours, than the first consciousness of love, the first fluttering of its silken wings ; the first rising sound and breath of that wind which is so soon to sweep through the soul, to purify or to destroy ! Old histories tell us that the great Emperor Charlemagne stamped his edicts with the hilt of his sword.
Page 51 - Chinese proverb is true ; a single conversation across the table with a wise man is better than ten years
Page 258 - They are all gone into the world of light ! And I alone sit lingering here ; Their very memory is fair and bright, And my sad thoughts doth clear. It glows and glitters in my cloudy breast, Like stars upon some gloomy grove, Or those faint beams in which this hill is drest, After the sun's remove.
Page 196 - O Land ! O Land ! For all the broken-hearted The mildest herald by our fate allotted, Beckons, and with inverted torch doth stand To lead us with a gentle hand Into the land of the great Departed, Into the Silent Land ;
Page 258 - After the sun's remove. I see them walking in an air of glory, "Whose light doth trample on my days My days, which are at best but dull and hoary, Mere glimmering and decays.
Page 203 - I KNOW a maiden fair to see, Take care ! She can both false and friendly be, Beware ! Beware ! Trust her not. She is fooling thee ! She has two eyes, so soft and brown, Take care ! She gives a side-glance and looks down, Beware ! Beware ! Trust her not, She ifl fooling thee ! And she has hair of a golden hue, Take care ! And what she says, it is not true, Beware ! Beware ! Trunt her not, She is fooling thee ! She has a bosom as white as snow, Take care ! She knows how much it is best to show.

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