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" ... what they have done is in reality little. The beginning of civilization is the discovery of some useful arts, by which men acquire property, comforts, or luxuries. The necessity or desire of preserving them leads to laws and social institutions. The... "
HISTORY OF CALHOUN COUNTY MICHIGAN - Page 681
by HON. WASHINGTON GARDNER - 1913
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A series of lessons, in prose and verse, progessively arranged [ed.] by J.M ...

James Melville M'Culloch - 1831
...improving and civilizing the world than really belongs to them. What they have done is in reality little. The beginning of civilization is the discovery of...preserving them leads to laws and social institutions. The discovery of peculiar arts gives superiority to particular nations ; and the love of power induces...
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Public and private economy, Volume 1

Theodore Sedgwick - Social Science - 1836
...advance beyond that which he now possesses. The beginning of civilization (says Sir Humphrey Davy) is in the discovery of some useful arts, by which men acquire property, comforts, and luxuries. Man first begins to till the earth with some rude instrument like a pointed stone, he...
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The moral and intellectual school book

William Martin - Readers - 1838 - 348 pages
...greater share than really belongs to them in the work : while what they have done is in reality little. The beginning of civilization is the discovery of...preserving them leads to laws and social institutions. The discovery of peculiar arts gives superiority, to subjugate other nations, who learn their arts,...
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The Saturday Magazine, Volume 13

Periodicals - 1839
...much greater share than really belongs to them in the work : what they have done is in reality little. The beginning of civilization is the discovery of...preserving them leads to laws and social institutions. The discovery of peculiar arts gives superiority to particular nations ; and the love of power induces...
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Half-hours with the best authors, selected by C. Knight

Half hours - 1847
...greater share than really belongs to them in the work ; what they have dorfls is in reality little. The beginning of civilization is the discovery of some useful arts by which men acquire propenj. comforts, or luxuries. The necessity or desire of preserving then: leads to laws and social...
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Half-hours with the best authors, selected by C. Knight, Volume 2

Half hours - 1856
...greater share than really belongs to them in the work ; what they have done is in reality little. The beginning of civilization is the discovery of...preserving them leads to laws and social institutions. The discovery of peculiar arts gives superiority to particular nations ; and the love of power induces...
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Half-hours with the best authors, selected by C. Knight

Half hours - 1856
...really belongs to them in the work ; what they have done is in reality little. The beginning a civilization is the discovery of some useful arts...The necessity or desire of preserving them leads to law and social institutions. The discovery of peculiar arts gives superiority to particular nations...
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STORIES OF INVENTORS AND DISCOVERERS IN SCIENCE AND THE USEFUL ARTS.

JOHN TIMBS - 1860
...8QUABE. I860. TO THE KEADER. SIB HTJMPHEEY DAVY, in his last work of charming philosophy, remarks : " The beginning of civilization is the discovery of...preserving them leads to laws and social institutions, The discovery of peculiar arts gives superiority to particular nations ; and the love of power induces...
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Stories of Inventors and Discoverers in Science and the Useful Arts: A Book ...

John Timbs - Inventions - 1860 - 376 pages
...SIB HUMPHRY DAVY, in his last work of charming philosophy, remarks : " The beginning of civilisation is the discovery of some useful arts, by which men...preserving them leads to laws and social institutions. The discovery of peculiar arts gives superiority to particular nations ; and the love of power induces...
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The great inventions: their history, from the earliest period to the present ...

Franc Bangs Wilkie - Inventions - 1883 - 687 pages
...fashioning into implements, utensils and ornaments. " The beginning of civilization," says Sir H. Davy, " is the discovery of some useful arts by which men acquire property, comfort and luxuries." The art of making bronze gave additional value to the property of men and aided...
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