Syllabus of Lectures on International Conciliation: Given at Leland Stanford Junior University (Google eBook)

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World Peace Foundation, 1912 - Arbitration (International law) - 180 pages
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Page 108 - July, 1899, provided, nevertheless, that they do not affect the vital interests, the independence, or the honor of the two Contracting States, and do not concern the interests of third parties.
Page 122 - ... sent by the Netherland Government through the diplomatic channel to the Powers invited to the Second Peace Conference, as well as to the other Powers which have adhered to the Convention.
Page 95 - Precious and semi-precious stones, pearls, mother-ofpearl, and coral. 14. Clocks and watches, other than chronometers. 15. Fashion and fancy goods. 16. Feathers of all kinds, hairs, and bristles. 17.
Page 9 - Taint afollerin' your bell-wethers Will excuse ye in His sight; Ef you take a sword an' dror it, An' go stick a feller thru, Guv'ment aint to answer for it, God '11 send the bill to you.
Page 117 - To prohibit the use of bullets which expand or flatten easily in the human body, such as bullets with a hard envelope, of which the envelope does not entirely cover the core, or is pierced with incisions.
Page 174 - Neither are any wars so furious and bloody, or of so long continuance, as those occasioned by difference in opinion, especially if it be in things indifferent.
Page 9 - Taint your eppyletts an' feathers Make the thing a grain more right) Taint afollerin' your bell-wethers Will excuse ye in His sight; Ef you take a sword an...
Page 174 - Prince quarrelleth with another, for fear the other should quarrel with him. Sometimes a War is entered upon, because the Enemy is too strong, and sometimes because he is too weak. Sometimes our...
Page 100 - ... which are justiciable in their nature by reason of being susceptible of decision by the application of the principles of law or equity...
Page 174 - what were the usual causes or motives that made one country go to war with another?" I answered "they were innumerable; but I should only mention a few of 174 the chief. Sometimes the ambition of princes, who never think they have land or people enough to govern; sometimes the corruption of ministers, who engage their master in a war, in order to stifle or divert the clamour of the subjects against their evil administration.

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