The Works of Christopher Marlowe Including His Translations (Google eBook)

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Chatto & Windus, 1889 - 376 pages
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Page 272 - With coral clasps and amber studs : And if these pleasures may thee move, Come live with me and be my Love.
Page 60 - Shall I make spirits fetch me what I please, Resolve me of all ambiguities, Perform what desperate enterprise I will ? Ill have them fly to India for gold, Ransack the ocean for orient pearl. And search all corners of the new-found world For pleasant fruits and princely delicates...
Page 306 - I'll leap up to my God! Who pulls me down? See, see where Christ's blood streams in the firmament! One drop would save my soul, half a drop, ah, my Christ!
Page 198 - It lies not in our power to love or hate, For will in us is overruled by fate. When two are stript, long ere the course begin, We wish that one should lose, the other win : And one especially do we affect Of two gold ingots, like in each respect : The reason no man knows ; let it suffice, What we behold is censured by our eyes. Where both deliberate, the love is slight ; Who ever loved, that loved not at first sight ?' He kneel'd ; but unto her devoutly pray'd : Chaste Hero to herself thus softly...
Page 12 - Warring within our breasts for regiment. Doth teach us all to have aspiring minds: Our souls, whose faculties can comprehend The wondrous architecture of the world, And measure every wandering planet's course, Still climbing after knowledge infinite, And always moving as the restless spheres, Will us to wear ourselves, and never rest, Until we reach the ripest fruit of all, That perfect bliss and sole felicity, The sweet fruition of an earthly crown.
Page 290 - Philosophy is odious and obscure; Both law and physic are for petty wits; Divinity is basest of the three, Unpleasant, harsh, contemptible, and vile: 'Tis magic, magic, that hath ravish'd me.
Page 63 - I'd give them all for Mephistophilis. By him I'll be great Emperor of the world, And make a bridge thorough the moving air, To pass the ocean with a band of men : I'll join the hills that bind the Afric shore, And make that country continent to Spain, And both contributory to my crown.
Page 88 - Give me the merchants of the Indian mines, That trade in metal of the purest mould; The wealthy Moor, that in the eastern rocks Without control can pick his "riches up, And in his house heap pearl like...
Page 296 - Have not I made blind Homer sing to me Of Alexander's love and CEnon's death? And hath not he, that built the walls of Thebes With ravishing sound of his melodious harp, Made* music with my Mephistophilis...
Page 272 - The shepherd swains shall dance and sing For thy delight each May morning: If these delights thy mind may move, Then live with me and be my love.

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