Narrative, of a Five Years' Expedition, Against the Revolted Negroes of Surinam, in Guiana, on the Wild Coast of South America; from the Year 1772, to 1777:: Elucidating the History of that Country, and Describing Its Productions, ... with an Account of the Indians of Guiana, & Negroes of Guinea, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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J. Johnson, ... & Th. Payne, 1813 - Slavery
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Page 396 - Lo, the poor Indian ! whose untutor'd mind Sees God in clouds, or hears him in the wind; His soul, proud science never taught to stray Far as the solar walk, or milky way...
Page 3 - The latent tracts, the giddy heights, explore Of all who blindly creep, or sightless soar; Eye Nature's walks, shoot Folly as it flies, And catch the manners living as they rise; Laugh where we must, be candid where we can; But vindicate the ways of God to man.
Page 99 - The wanton courser thus with reins unbound Breaks from his stall, and beats the trembling ground; Pamper'd and proud, he seeks the wonted tides, And laves, in height of blood, his shining sides...
Page 74 - Eased of her load, Subjection grows more light; And Poverty looks cheerful in thy sight! Thou mak'st the gloomy face of Nature gay; Giv'st beauty to the sun, and pleasure to the day!
Page 190 - The British fire. You, gallant Vernon, saw The miserable scene ; you, pitying, saw To infant weakness sunk the warrior's arm ; Saw the deep-racking pang, the ghastly form, The lip pale quivering, and the beamless eye No more with ardour bright...
Page 396 - Some happier island in the wat'ry waste, Where slaves once more their native land behold, No fiends torment, no Christians thirst for gold. To be, contents his natural desire, He asks no angel's wing, no seraph's fire ; But thinks, admitted to that equal sky, His faithful dog shall bear him company. Go, wiser thou ! and, in thy scale of sense, Weigh thy opinion against Providence ; Call imperfection what thou fanciest such, Say, Here he gives too little, there too much...
Page 210 - Lord, and set me down in the midst of the valley which was full of 'bones; and caused me to pass by them round about ; and, behold, there were very many in the open valley ; and, lo, they were very dry. And he said unto me, Son of man, can these bones live? And I answered, O Lord God, thou knowest.
Page 32 - DissipaDissipation and luxury appear to be congenial to the inhabitants of this climate, and great numbers must annually fall victims to their very destructive influence. Their fatal consequences are indeed too visible in the men, who have indulged themselves in intemperance and other sensual gratifications, and who appear withered and enervated in the extreme...
Page 72 - The vital spirit issued at the wound, And left the members quivering on the ground. From the same urn they drink the mingled wine, And add libations to the powers divine. While thus their prayers united mount the sky...
Page 417 - Apollo's altars in his native town. Now with full force the yielding horn he bends, Drawn to an arch, and joins the doubling ends; Close to his breast he strains the nerve below, Till the barb'd point approach the circling bow; Th' impatient weapon whizzes on the wing; Sounds the tough horn, and twangs the quiv'ring string.

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