Not Out of Africa: How Afrocentrism Became an Excuse to Teach Myth As History

Front Cover
Basic Books, Aug 4, 2008 - History - 320 pages
18 Reviews
Not Out of Africa has sparked widespread debate over the teaching of revisionist history in schools and colleges. Was Socrates black? Did Aristotle steal his ideas from the library in Alexandria? Do we owe the underlying tenets of our democratic civilizaiton to the Africans? Mary Lefkowitz explains why politically motivated histories of the ancient world are being written and shows how Afrocentrist claims blatantly contradict the historical evidence. Not Out of Africa is an important book that protects and argues for the necessity of historical truths and standards in cultural education.For this new paperback edition, Mary Lefkowitz has written an epilogue in which she responds to her critics and offers topics for further discussion. She has also added supplementary notes, a bibliography with suggestions for further reading, and a glossary of names.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
4
4 stars
6
3 stars
5
2 stars
2
1 star
1

Review: Not Out of Africa: How Afrocentrism Became an Excuse to Teach Myth as History

User Review  - Jean Piriou - Goodreads

It is sad that Lefkowitz and other scholars have had to take time away from their scholarship, in which they were trained (unlike Bernal, trained in Chinese history and language) to refute a ... Read full review

Review: Not Out of Africa: How Afrocentrism Became an Excuse to Teach Myth as History

User Review  - C. Derick Varn - Goodreads

It some major ways this book seems dated since the form of Afrocentrism it critiques seems to have little cache in the academy now. Furthermore, the epilogue on personal attacks also seems entirely ... Read full review

Contents

I
xi
II
1
III
12
IV
53
V
91
VI
122
VII
155
VIII
177
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2008)

Mary Lefkowitz is the Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities at Wellesley College. She is the author of many books on ancient Greece and Rome, including Lives of the Greek Poets and Women in Greek Myth, as well as articles for the Wall Street Journal and the New Republic. She is the coeditor of Women’s Life in Greece and Rome and Black Athena Revisited.

Bibliographic information