The Art of Painting: (Google eBook)

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B. L. [i.e. Bernard Lintott] and sold, 1716 - Painters - 397 pages
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Contents

I
i
II
lxii
III
2
IV
3
V
81
VI
223
VII
239
VIII
241
IX
247
X
269

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Page xxxi - French critics, by studying the precepts of Aristotle and Horace, and having the example of the Grecian poets before their eyes...
Page xlviii - This, says my author, is the gift of Jupiter; and, to speak in the same heathen language, we call it the gift of our Apollo : not to be obtained by pains or study, if we are not born to it; for the motions which are studied are never so natural as those which break out in the height of a real passion. Mr...
Page lvii - curiosa felicitas" which Petronius attributes to Horace. It is the pencil thrown luckily full upon the horse's mouth, to express the foam, •which the painter, with all his skill, could not perform without it. These hits of words, a true Poet often finds, as I may say, without seeking : but he knows their value when he finds them,'- and is infinitely pleased. A bad
Page vi - ... of the intellect, is itself the measure of the performing hand ; and being animated by the imagination, infuses life into the image. The idea of the painter and the sculptor is undoubtedly that perfect and excellent example of the mind, by imitation of which imagined form all things are represented which fall under human sight : such is the definition which is made by Cicero in his book of the "Orator...
Page 129 - If you would be satisfied in the measures of breadth, from the extremity of one finger to the other, so that this breadth should be equal to the length of the body, you must observe, that the boxes of the elbows with the humerus, and of the humerus with the shoulder-blade, bear the proportion of half a face, when the arms are stretched out. The sole of the foot is the sixth part of the figure.
Page 128 - ... to the upper part of the knee, two faces. The knee contains half a face. From the lower part of the knee to the ankle, two faces. From the ankle to the sole of the foot, half a face. A man, when his arms are stretched out, is, from the longest finger of his right hand, to the longest of his left, as broad as he is long.
Page lix - Poet ought to judge exactly when the colouring and expressions are perfect, and then to think their work is truly finished. Apelles said of Protogenes, that " he knew not when to give over." A work may be over-wrought as well as under-wrought : too much labour often takes away the spirit, by adding to the polishing ; so that there remains nothing but a dull correctness, a piece without any considerable faults, but with few beauties : for when the spirits are drawn off, there is nothing but a
Page 128 - ... from the crown of the head to the sole of the foot, in the following manner : " From the crown of the head to the forehead is the third part of a face. " The face begins at the root of the lowest hairs which are upon the forehead, and ends at the bottom of the chin. " The face is divided into three proportionable parts ; the first contains the forehead, the second the nose, and the third the mouth and the chin ; from the chin to the pit betwixt the collar-bones are two lengths of a nose.
Page 128 - Which are upon the forehead, and ends at the bottom of the chin. The face is divided into three proportionable parts ; the first contains the forehead, the second the nose, and the third the mouth and the chin. From the chin to the pit betwixt the collarbones, are two lengths of a nose. From the pit betwixt the collar-bones to the bottom of the breast, one face. * From the bottom of the breasts to the navel, one face.

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