Escaping Satiation: The Demand Side of Economic Growth

Front Cover
Ulrich Witt
Springer Science & Business Media, Jul 18, 2001 - Business & Economics - 197 pages
0 Reviews
The collection of papers presented in this special issue arose out of two events. The first was the symposium "Escaping Satiation - Increasing Product Variety, Preference Change and the Demand Side of Economic Growth" which was held at the Max Planck Institute in Jena, Germany, in December 1997. The Fritz Thyssen Foundation provided financial support for this seminal symposium which is gratefully acknowledged. Wilhelm Ruprecht was of great help in preparing the symposium and I would like to express my gratitude to hirn on this occasion. Many stimulating exchanges with hirn over the past few years while he was a research associate at the Institute working on long term changes in consumption convinced me of the relevance and importance of this problem for understanding modem economic growth. I also owe thanks to many people who encouraged me to go ahead with the symposium, among them Stanley Metcalfe, Carl Christian von Weizsäcker, and also Ehud Zuscovitch, who died so unexpectedly last year.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Consumption demand and economic growth an introduction
1
I Economic growth and the evolution of preferences
11
Cognition imagination and institutions in demand creation
13
Learning to consume A theory of wants and the growth of demand
29
Consumption preferences and the evolutionary agenda
43
The demand for distinction and the evolution of the prestige car
65
II Qualitative change and the interactions between demand and supply
83
A historical note
85
Knowledge consumption and endogenous growth
97
Variety growth and demand
115
Towards comparative and user studies
139
III The satiation problem
163
Satiation in an evolutionary model of structural economic dynamics
165
Satiation in an international economy
187
List of Contributors
199
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information