Remember me

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Random House, Incorporated, 1976 - Fiction - 248 pages
2 Reviews

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Review: Remember Me

User Review  - Christine - Goodreads

It's worth a read, but for me only the one. Read full review

Review: Remember Me

User Review  - Pamela - Goodreads

Unlike Alice Sebold's use of the "Afterlife theme" in The Lovely Bones, Weldon's is both witty and wrenching. Here is a very well written, piercing, no-holds- barred exposure of human behavior at it's most reptilian. Don't read this if you warm and fuzzy. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
152
Section 2
185
Section 3
250
Copyright

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About the author (1976)

Fay Weldon was born in Worcester, England, where her father was a physician and her mother a writer. She was educated at the University of St. Andrews, from which she received her M.A. in 1954. Six years later, she married Ronald Weldon. Weldon worked as a propaganda writer for the British Foreign Office and then as an advertising copywriter for various firms in London before making writing a full-time career. Since the mid-1960's she has written novels, short stories, and radio and television plays. The central subject of all Weldon's writing is the experience of women, especially their relationships with men. According to Weldon, "Women must ask themselves: What is it that will give me fulfillment? That's the serious question I'm attempting to answer." Despite her concern with women, Weldon has been criticized by some feminist groups for apparently presenting fictional women with very limited options. Weldon's style is marked by a careful attention to detail, vivid images, a sharp wit, and a wry sense of humor. Although most of her male characters are disagreeable, they are not the true villains of her novels. Her villains are, in fact, the traditional roles that men and women play. Weldon looks at women in many different circumstances - at work, at home, at play, in politics, and especially in love - and shows not only how they are manipulated by men, but also how they allow themselves to be manipulated. Recently, Weldon's novel The Life and Loves of a She-Devil (1983) has been made into a popular movie. It was formerly a successful television miniseries.

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