Autonomy and Community: The Royal Manor of Havering, 1200-1500

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Cambridge University Press, Jun 27, 2002 - Business & Economics - 336 pages
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This history of the English royal manor of Havering, Essex, illustrates life at one extreme of the spectrum of personal and collective freedom during the later Middle Ages, revealing the kinds of patterns which could emerge when medieval people were placed in a setting of unusual independence. As residents of a manor held by the crown, they profited from royal administrative neglect. As tenants of the ancient royal demesne, they had special legal rights and economic privileges. Havering's dominant families controlled the legal and administrative life of their community through the powerful manor court. The tenants combined effectively to prevent outside interference in their affairs, despite the individualistic self-interest manifest in their economic dealings. In 1465 the tenants obtained a royal charter which established Havering as a formal Liberty, with its own justices of the peace. By the end of the fifteenth century Havering displayed many characteristics commonly associated with the Elizabethan and Jacobean periods.
  

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Contents

VI
13
VII
15
VIII
42
IX
50
X
51
XI
57
XII
66
XIII
76
XXVII
181
XXVIII
182
XXIX
185
XXX
191
XXXI
201
XXXII
215
XXXIII
221
XXXIV
223

XIV
87
XV
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XVI
90
XVII
116
XVIII
126
XIX
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XX
137
XXI
152
XXII
160
XXIII
166
XXIV
170
XXV
176
XXVI
179
XXXV
235
XXXVI
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XXXVII
244
XXXVIII
261
XXXIX
265
XL
275
XLI
277
XLII
280
XLIII
285
XLIV
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XLV
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About the author (2002)

Marjorie Keniston McIntosh is Distinguished Professor of History Emerita at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Her previous publications include Controlling Misbehavior in England, 1370 1600 (Cambridge University Press, 1998), Working Women in English Society, 1300 1620 (Cambridge University Press, 2005) and two books about colonial and postcolonial African women.

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