Things the Grandchildren Should Know

Front Cover
Macmillan, Oct 14, 2008 - Biography & Autobiography - 245 pages
3 Reviews

Growing up in the Virginia suburbs, Mark Oliver Everett was to roam unsupervised with his sister, Liz, while his mother combated depression and his father, the eccentric and acclaimed quantum physicist Hugh Everett, remained distant and obsessed by parallel universes of his own creation.  (Everett writes, "As a little kid, I had a hard time with the realization that inanimate objects didn't have feelings or thoughts. I remember being on the verge of tears, standing there in the bathroom, as my mom tried to make me understand that the bathroom cabinet wasn't going to be hurt if I closed it too hard. I thought of the bathroom cabinet as one of my friends. Maybe I was confused because I thought of my father as a piece of furniture.") First, the author lost his father to heart failure, and then—in a staggeringly short period of time—his sister to schizophrenia and suicide and his mother to cancer. The author drew upon the relentless tragedies in his life for inspiration in writing highly acclaimed music with his indie rock group, the Eels.  Yet this is much more than a musician's tale. A true gem of a memoir, Everett’s story is a rich and poignant narrative on coming of age, love, death, and the creative vision.

  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Summer of Love
1
Good Old Days Shut Up or Die
11
First Girlfriend
33
Troubled Teens
39
Elizabeth on the Bathroom Floor Dad in the Trash
55
Soda Jerk
65
Hope Ya Like Starvin
77
Garage Sale
87
A Day at the Beach Honolulu Hurricane
103
Happy Trails
125
Estate Sale
161
Im Mad at You Nina Simone Is Dead
175
Rock Hard Times
189
Blinking Lights For Me
213
Things The Grandchildren Should Know
223
Now What?
239

Love Crazy Girls
97

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2008)

Mark Oliver Everett is the lead singer, guitarist, and keyboardist of indie rock band The Eels. Rolling Stone magazine called Everett "the Kurt Vonnegut of the rock world." The author is the son of physicist Hugh Everett III, originator of the "Many Worlds" theory of quantum physics. While coping with the deaths of every member of his immediate family, Everett turned tragedy into the impetus for recording such acclaimed albums Electro-Shock Blues and Blinking Lights and Other Revelations.

Bibliographic information