Relational Frame Theory: A Post-Skinnerian Account of Human Language and Cognition

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Steven C. Hayes, Dermot Barnes-Holmes, Bryan Roche
Springer Science & Business Media, May 31, 2001 - Computers - 285 pages
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Human language and our use of it to communicate or to understand the world requires deriving relations among events: for example, if A=B and A=C, then B=C. Relational frame theory argues that such performances are at the heart of any meaningful psychology of language and cognition. From a very early age, human beings learn relations of similarity, difference, comparison, time, and so on, and modify what they do in a given situation based on its derived relation to others situations and what is known about them.
This volume goes beyond theory and gives the empirical and conceptual tools to conduct an experimental analysis of virtually every substantive topic in human language and cognition, both basic and applied. As the term `post-Skinnerian' suggests, this volume challenges behavioral psychology to abandon many of the specific theoretical formulations of its most prominent historical leader in the domain of complex human behavior, especially in human language and cognition, and approach the field from a new direction.

The need for a pragmatically useful analysis of language and cognition is as enormous and varied as its extensions and applications. This volume will be of interest not only to behavior theorists but also to cognitive psychologists, therapists, educators, and anyone studying the human condition.

  

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An exceptional, inductive approach to language and cognition that can be refreshing for behavioral scientists of all stripes. The experimental analysis of human cognition has gained much since Skinner's much-maligned attempt half a century ago, and one may even imagine such diverse research streams may bring behavioral psychology back in the limelight.  

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Page 258 - REFERENCES Addis, ME, & Jacobson, NS (1996). Reasons for depression and the process and outcome of cognitive-behavioral psychotherapies. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 64, 1417-1424.

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About the author (2001)

Steven C. Hayes, PhD, is Nevada Foundation Professor at the Department of Psychology at the University of Nevada. An author of 34 books and more than 470 scientific articles, he has shown in his research how language and thought leads to human suffering, and has developed acceptance and commitment therapy, a powerful therapy method that is useful in a wide variety of areas. Hayes has been president of several scientific societies and has received several national awards, including the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapy.

Niklas Torneke, MD, is a psychiatrist and has worked as a senior psychiatrist in the department of general psychiatry in his hometown Kalmar (in the southeast of Sweden) from 1991 until he started private practice 1998. He earned license as a psychotherapist in 1996 and was originally trained as a cognitive therapist. Since 1998 he has worked mainly with acceptance and commitment therapy, both in his own practice and as a teacher and clinical supervisor. His clinical experience ranges from psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia to common anxiety and mood disorders with high prevalence in the general population.

Bryan Roche, PhD, CPsychol, CSci, AFBPsS, graduated with his doctorate in behavior analysis in 1995, after which he took up academic posts at University College Cork, Ireland and the University of Bath, UK. His current position is at the National University of Ireland, Maynooth. Roche has published approximately eighty articles, peer-reviewed papers, and book chapters on relational frame theory (RFT) and related topics. In particular, his research has involved the application of RFT to the study of social and sexual behavior, the understanding and treatment of anxiety, and most recently the development of online relational frame training interventions to increase intelligence quotients (raiseyouriq.com). He was coeditor of the book Relational Frame Theory: A Post-Skinnerian Analysis of Language and Cognition (2001). Roche currently sits on the editorial boards of several behavior-analytic journals, and is a regular ad-hoc reviewer for several of the major international journals of behavioral psychology.

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