Ivanhoe: A Romance, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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T. Desilver, 1823 - English fiction
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Review: Ivanhoe

User Review  - Bruce - Goodreads

Sir Walter Scott is commonly considered the father of the historical novel, his Waverley novels consisting of a series of twenty-two works of which Ivanhoe is one. Published in 1819, this novel is ... Read full review

Review: Ivanhoe

User Review  - Daniel - Goodreads

I had very high expectations for this book, having a huge fascination for the time-period in which it is set, but Walter Scott couldn't help but fuck it up. Every so often he ruins the tone by ... Read full review

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Page 115 - The lists now presented a most splendid spectacle. The sloping galleries were crowded with all that was noble, great, wealthy, and beautiful in the northern and midland parts of England; and the contrast of the various dresses of these dignified spectators rendered the view as gay as it was rich, while the interior and lower space, filled with the substantial burgesses and yeomen of merry England, formed, in their more plain attire, a dark fringe, or border, around this circle of brilliant embroidery,...
Page 182 - Now, Locksley," said Prince John to the bold yeoman, with a bitter smile, " wilt thou try conclusions with Hubert, or wilt thou yield up bow, baldric, and quiver, to the Provost of the sports ?" " Sith it be no better," said Locksley, " I am content to try my fortune ; on condition that when I have shot two shafts at yonder mark of Hubert's, he shall be bound to shoot one at that which I shall propose." " That is but fair," answered Prince John, " and it shall not be refused thee.
Page 117 - With the eyes of an immense concourse of spectators fixed upon them, the five knights advanced up the platform upon which the tents of the challengers stood, and there separating themselves, each touched slightly, and with the reverse of his lance, the shield of the antagonist to whom he wished to oppose himself. The lower orders of spectators in general nay, many of the higher class, and it is even said several of the ladies, were rather disappointed at the champions choosing the arms of courtesy.
Page 206 - FAR in a wild, unknown to public view, From youth to age a reverend hermit grew ; The moss his bed, the cave his humble cell, His food the fruits, his drink the crystal well : Remote from man, with God he pass'd the days, Prayer all his business, all his pleasure praise.
Page 120 - Saracenic music of the challengers concluded one of those long and high flourishes with which they had broken the silence of the lists, it was answered by a solitary trumpet, which breathed a note of defiance from the northern extremity. All eyes were turned to see the new champion which these sounds announced, and no sooner were the barriers opened than he paced into the lists.
Page 121 - He was mounted on a gallant black horse, and as he passed through the lists he gracefully saluted the Prince and the ladies by lowering his lance. The dexterity with which he managed his steed, and something of youthful grace which he displayed in his manner, won him the...
Page 123 - Norman on the visor, where his lance's point kept hold of the bars. Yet, even at this disadvantage, the Templar sustained his high reputation ; and had not the girths of his saddle burst, he might not have been unhorsed. As it chanced, however, saddle, horse, and man, rolled on the ground under a cloud of dust.
Page 184 - I will crave your Grace's permission to plant such a mark as is used in the North Country; and welcome every brave yeoman who shall try a shot at it to win a smile from the bonny lass he loves best." He then turned to leave the lists. "Let your guards attend me," he said, "if you please ; I go but to cut a rod from the next willow bush.
Page 185 - but I have vowed that, if ever I take service, it should be with your royal brother King Richard. These twenty nobles I leave to Hubert, who has this day drawn as brave a bow as his grandsire did at Hastings. Had his modesty not refused the trial, he would have hit the wand as well as I.
Page 96 - Files in their hands, and hammers at their side, And nails for loosen'd spears, and thongs for shields provide. The yeomen guard the streets in seemly bands, And clowns come crowding on with cudgels in their hands.

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