Imperial Texas: An Interpretive Essay in Cultural Geography (Google eBook)

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University of Texas Press, Jul 22, 2010 - History - 145 pages
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Imperial Texas examines the development of Texas as a human region, from the simple outline of the Spanish colony to the complex patterns of the modern state. In this study in cultural geography set into a historical framework, D. W. Meinig, professor of geography at Syracuse University, discusses the "various peoples of Texas, who they are, where they came from, where they settled, and how they are proportioned one to another from place to place." After examining the historical framework, he then presents detailed analyses of the major regions of modem Texas and an over-all characterization of the state and its people. He concludes that, although Texas has never been the empire that it has sometimes been called, "nevertheless... Texas is something more than just one-fourteenth of the American area, one-twentieth of the American people, and one-fiftieth of the American union."

  

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Contents

Introduction
17
I Implantation
23
II Assertion
38
III Expansion
63
IV Elaboration
79
V Differentiation
91
VI Characterization
110
Sources
125
Index
137
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