Journal of the Convention: For Framing a Constitution of Government for the State of Massachusetts Bay, from the Commencement of Their First Session, September 1, 1779, to the Close of Their Last Session, June 16, 1780 (Google eBook)

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Dutton and Wentworth, printers to the state, 1832 - Constitutional conventions - 264 pages
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Page 229 - ... to make, ordain, and establish all manner of wholesome and reasonable orders, laws, statutes, and ordinances, directions, and instructions, either with penalties or without ; so as the same be not repugnant or contrary to this constitution, as they shall judge to be for the good and welfare of this commonwealth, and for the government and ordering thereof, and of the subjects of the same...
Page 194 - Every subject of the Commonwealth ought to find a certain remedy, by having recourse to the laws, for all injuries or wrongs which he may receive in his person, property or character. He ought to obtain right and justice freely, and without being obliged to purchase it ; completely, and without any denial ; promptly, and without delay, conformably to the laws.
Page 95 - In the government of this commonwealth, the Legislative department shall never exercise the executive and judicial powers, or either of them; the executive shall never exercise the Legislative and judicial powers, or either of them; the judicial shall never exercise the legislative and executive powers, or either of them ; to the end it may be a government of laws and not of men.
Page 227 - It is essential to the preservation of the rights of every individual, his life, liberty, property, and character that there be an impartial interpretation of the laws, and administration of justice. It is the right of every citizen to be tried by judges as free, impartial, and independent as the lot of humanity will admit.
Page 194 - Government is instituted for the common good ; for the protection, safety, prosperity, and happiness of the people; and not for the profit, honor, or private interest of any one man, family, or class of men...
Page 225 - Each individual of the society has a right to be protected by it in the enjoyment of his life, liberty and property, according to standing laws.
Page 226 - A frequent recurrence to the fundamental principles of the constitution, and a constant adherence to those of piety, justice, moderation, temperance, industry and frugality, are absolutely necessary to preserve the advantages of liberty, and to maintain a free government.
Page 151 - And no subject shall be arrested, imprisoned, despoiled, or deprived of his property, immunities, or privileges, put out of the protection of the law, exiled, or deprived of his life, liberty, or estate, but by the judgment of his peers, or the law of the land.
Page 192 - is a social compact by which the whole people covenants with each citizen, and each citizen with the whole people, that all shall be governed by certain laws for the common good.
Page 198 - ... so as the same be not repugnant or contrary to this Constitution ; and to impose and levy proportional and reasonable assessments, rates, and taxes, upon all the inhabitants of, and persons resident, and estates lying within the said Commonwealth...

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