Phantastes: a faerie romance (Google eBook)

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Review: Phantastes

User Review  - Emma - Goodreads

"Picking up a copy of Phantastes one day at a train station bookstall, I began to read. A few hours later, I knew that I had crossed a great frontier. My imagination, in a certain sense, was baptized ... Read full review

Review: Phantastes

User Review  - Stephen Case - Goodreads

Lots of thoughts on this book. It's not great fantasy. The plot meanders, leaves things unfulfilled and under explained or simply unfinished. The language at times is eye-rollingly bad. But it's also ... Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
9
III
12
IV
34
V
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VI
65
VII
78
VIII
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XIV
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XV
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XVI
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XXII
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XXIV
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Page 99 - O Lady! we receive but what we give And in our life alone does Nature live: Ours is her wedding garment, ours her shroud! And would we aught behold of higher worth, Than that inanimate cold world allowed To the poor loveless ever-anxious crowd, Ah! from the soul itself must issue forth A light, a glory, a fair luminous cloud Enveloping the Earth And from the soul itself must there be sent A sweet and potent voice, of its own birth, Of all sweet sounds the life and element!
Page 123 - The appearance, instantaneously disclosed, Was of a mighty City — boldly say A wilderness of building, sinking far And self-withdrawn into a wondrous depth, Far sinking into splendour — without end ! Fabric it seemed of diamond and of gold, With alabaster domes, and silver spires, And blazing terrace upon terrace, high Uplifted...
Page 228 - Alas, how easily things go wrong ! A sigh too much, or a kiss too long, And there follows a mist and a weeping rain, And life is never the same again.
Page 330 - This book is one which, perhaps, no other man could have written, and one for which the world ought to be and will be thankful. It is in the highest degree eloquent, acute, stimulating to thought, and fertile in suggestion. It shows a power of practical criticism which, when fixed...
Page 334 - The Cauvery, Kistnah, and Godavery : being a Report on the Works constructed on those Rivers, for the Irrigation of Provinces in the Presidency of Madras. By R. BAIRD SMITH, FGS, Lt-Col. Bengal Engineers, &c., &c. In demy Svo, with 19 Plans, price 28s. cloth. " A most curious and interesting work.
Page 331 - Lectures — eloquent, graphic, and impassioned— exposing and ridiculing some of the vices of our present system of building, and exciting his hearers by strong motives of duty and pleasure to attend to architecture — are very successful ; and, like his former works, will command public attention. His style is terse, vigorous, and sparkling, and his book is both animated and attractive.
Page 331 - Mr. Ruskin's work will send the painter more than ever to the study of nature ; will train men who have always been delighted spectators of nature, to be also attentive observers. Our critics will learn to admire, and mere admirers will learn how to criticise : thus a public will be educated.
Page 330 - Mr. Ruskin is in possession of a clear and penetrating mind ; he is undeniably practical in his fundamental ideas ; full of the deepest reverence for all that appears to him beautiful and holy. His style is, as usual, clear, bold, racy. Mr. Ruskin is one of the first writers of the day.
Page 336 - Eyre' is not absent from this book. It possesses deep interest, and an irresistible grasp of reality. There are scenes which, for strength and delicacy of emotion, are not transcended in the range of English fiction.
Page 330 - The present volume of Mr. Rnskin's elaborate work treats chiefly of mountain scenery, and discusses at length the principles involved in the pleasure we derive from mountains and their pictorial representation. The singular beauty of his style, the hearty sympathy with all forms of natural loveliness, the profusion of his illustrations form irresistible attractions."— Daily News.

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