The Exploding Whale: And Other Remarkable Stories from the Evening News

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WestWinds Press, 2003 - Nature - 224 pages
4 Reviews
This lively and entertaining autobiography about the career of a television news reporter begins and ends with the one story he covered early in this career that just won't go away.   The scene made "cult-classic status" right from the start: here's rookie broadcast newsman Paul Linnman in the foreground, reporting on a tricky situation at the Oregon coast. State government officials have been working to remove the body of a beached whale, long dead and now rotting. The solution: explosives. As Linnman ducks, the skies issue forth chunks of whale meat, and Linnman's live-action reporting takes its place in broadcast history.   The title piece is merely one career highlight among many for Linnman, who writes from the inside about his work in this glamorous field.  Linnman reflects on the inspiring people and incredible events, as well as the just plain oddities that he's witnessed over the years. You'll laugh, you'll cry, and you will enjoy this behind scenes look at life on camera.

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Review: Exploding Whale: And Other Remarkable Stories from

User Review  - Lisa - Goodreads

Since 2006, I've read many books about my adopted home state of Oregon. This one was on my must-read shelf because the exploding whale story is too strange not to be true, and I wanted to get the ... Read full review

Review: Exploding Whale: And Other Remarkable Stories from

User Review  - Kimberly - Goodreads

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xBgThv... <----original newscast video link...LOL!!!! Read full review

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Contents

Preface
5
Chapter
13
Meanwhile Back at the Whale
19
Copyright

22 other sections not shown

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About the author (2003)

Paul Linnman grew up in Portland, Oregon and began reporting for his high school newspaper and became its sports editor. His first paying part-time college job was working for The Oregonian newspaper. Paul moved on to television, and he starting covering some strange, and unusual stories. Graduating to the evening news anchor for the local ABC-TV affiliate, his name and face became recognized across the state. Today Paul and his wife, Vicki still live in Portland, Oregon and Paul has moved into radio where he is one of the most listened to morning drive time radio hosts. 

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