Crooked River Country: Wranglers, Rogues, and Barons

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Washington State University Press, Oct 30, 2007 - History - 331 pages
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Crooked River Country is a sweeping account of north central Oregon's thrilling history, primarily the years between 1800 and 1950. Bordered by intimidating natural barriers, the rough country and harsh winters produced equally hardy inhabitants. Legends include Billy Chinook, Chief Paulina, Elisha Barnes, James M. Blakely, Newt Williamson, James J. Hill, Johnnie Hudspeth, and Les Schwab. In the early 1800s, only Native Americans, fur trappers, military expeditions, and missionaries roamed the forbidding setting, but after mid-century, pioneer families discovered lush pastures nestled in the expanse between the Cascades and the Blue Mountains. The homestead boom sparked deadly Paiute raids and conflicts over grazing rights. As land became more precious, Native Americans were forced onto reservations and "Vigilante" ranchers terrorized settlers. "Moonshiners" fought back. Dishonest politicians and capitalists exploited land claim laws and stole vast amounts of timberland. Steamship and railroad lines further opened the region, and the territory gradually became less wild. Big eastern lumber companies arrived and constructed the largest pine mills in the world. The stock market collapsed, and citizens faced severe economic depression intensified by prolonged drought. New Deal programs, good rainfall, and World War II eventually spurred industrial and population growth. Crooked River Country presents the captivating and thoroughly researched saga of the region's astonishing transformation.

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Contents

Where Lies the Subject
1
Town of Paulina
9
Fur Men 1820sl 830s
11
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Prineville resident David Braly is a former journalist and popular author of numerous articles about the West. He was selected as a 2005 Spur Award finalist for best western short fiction.

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