Questions and Supplement to Goodrich's History of the United States (Google eBook)

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Jenks & Palmer, 1846 - United States - 192 pages
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Page 179 - Equal and exact justice to all men, of whatever state or persuasion, religious or political; peace, commerce, and honest friendship with all nations, entangling alliances with none...
Page 178 - If there be any among us who would wish to dissolve this Union or to change its republican form, let them stand undisturbed as monuments of the safety with which error of opinion may be tolerated where reason is left free to combat it.
Page 179 - ... the vital principle of republics from which there is no appeal but to force, the vital principle and immediate parent of despotism; a well-disciplined militia, our best reliance in peace and for the first moments of war till regulars may relieve them; the supremacy of the civil over the military authority; economy in the public...
Page 137 - Read this declaration at the head of the army: every sword will be drawn from its scabbard, and the solemn vow uttered to maintain it, or to perish on the bed of honor.
Page 139 - He has endeavoured to prevent the Population of these States for that Purpose obstructing the Laws for naturalization of Foreigners refusing to pass others to encourage their migrations hither and raising the Conditions of new appropriations of Lands...
Page 138 - They will celebrate it with thanksgiving, with festivity, with bonfires, and illuminations. On its annual return they will shed tears, copious, gushing tears ; not of subjection and slavery, not of agony and distress, but of exultation, of gratitude, and of joy.
Page 179 - ... freedom of religion ; freedom of the press; and freedom of person under the protection of the Habeas Corpus, and trial by juries impartially selected.
Page 136 - The injustice of England has driven us to arms ; and, blinded to her own interest, for our good, she has obstinately persisted, till independence is now within our grasp. We have but to reach forth to it, and it is ours. Why then should we defer the declaration? Is any man so weak as now to hope for a reconciliation with England, which shall leave either safety to the country and its liberties, or safety to his own life and his own honor...
Page 137 - Publish it from the pulpit ; religion will approve it, and the love of religious liberty will cling round it, resolved to stand with it, or fall with it. Send it to the public halls; proclaim it there ; let them hear it who heard the first roar of the enemy's cannon ; let them see it who saw their brothers and their sons fall on the field of Bunker 'I Hill, and in the streets of Lexington and Concord, and the very walls will cry out in its support.
Page 136 - The war, then, must go on. We must fight it through. And if the war must go on, why put off longer the Declaration of Independence ? That measure will strengthen us. It will give us character abroad. The nations will then treat with us, which they never can do while we acknowledge ourselves subjects in arms against our sovereign. Nay, I maintain that England, herself, will sooner treat for peace with us on the footing of Independence, than consent, by repealing her acts, to acknowledge that her whole...

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