Christianity: The First Three Thousand Years

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Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated, 2011 - Religion - 1184 pages
22 Reviews
We live in a time of tremendous religious awareness, when both believers and non-believers are deeply engaged by questions of religion and tradition. This ambitious book ranges back to the origins of the Hebrew Bible and covers the world, following the three main strands of the Christian faith, to teach modern readers how Jesus' message spread and how the New Testament was formed. We follow the Christian story to all corners of the globe, filling in often neglected accounts of conversions and confrontations in Africa and Asia. And we discover the roots of the faith that galvanized America, charting the rise of the evangelical movement from its origins in Germany and England. We meet monks and crusaders, heretics and saints, slave traders and abolitionists, and discover Christianity's essential role in driving the Enlightenment and the Age of Exploration, and shaping the course of World Wars I and II.--From publisher description of 2010 ed.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - HadriantheBlind - LibraryThing

This is a rather astonishing overview of the history of Christianity. An ambitious subject to handle in one volume, and the author does a fine job as discussing the most disparate strands of this ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - KirkLowery - LibraryThing

This thousand page tome is excellent, with all the limitations of a single-volume work on such a large topic. The writing is excellent and the narrative coherent, but it is very dense. Don't expect ... Read full review

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About the author (2011)

Diarmaid Macculloch is the author of The Reformation, winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award, and Thomas Cranmer, winner of the Whitbread and Duff Cooper prizes. The son of an Anglican pastor, he is Professor of the History of the Church at Oxford University and a celebrated presenter of his own TV series.

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