Iron: Its History, Properties, and Processes of Manufacture (Google eBook)

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A. and C. Black, 1861 - Iron - 235 pages
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Page 242 - Companion : or, Directions for the Use of the Microscope, and for the Collection and Preservation of Plants, with a Glossary of Botanical Terms. Crown 8vo, price 2s. 6d. Botany and Religion ; or, Illustrations of the Works of God in the Structure, Functions, Arrangement, and General Distribution of Plants.
Page 241 - Manual of Botany : being an Introduction to the Study of the Structure, Physiology, and Classification of Plants.
Page 192 - From the evidence here brought forward, it is rendered exceedingly probable that the introduction of a heated blast in the manufacture of cast-iron has injured the softer irons, whilst it has frequently mollified and improved those of a harder nature ; and, considering the small deterioration that the irons of quality No. 2 have sustained, and the apparent benefit to those of No. 3, together with the great saving effected by the heated blast, there seems good reason for the process becoming as general...
Page 145 - ... of remelted pig or finery iron into steel or into malleable iron, without the use of fuel for reheating or continuing to heat the crude molten metal, such conversion being effected by forcing into and among the particles of a mass of molten iron currents of air or gaseous matter, containing or capable of evolving sufficient oxygen to keep up the combustion of the carbon contained in the iron till the conversion is accomplished.
Page 136 - This having been done, and the fluid iron run in, a rapid boiling up of the metal will be heard going on within the vessel. the metal being tossed violently about and dashed from side to side, shaking the vessel by the force with which it moves. From the throat of the converting vessel, flame will then immediately issue, accompanied by a few bright sparks.
Page 250 - KENILWORTH 13. THE PIRATE 14. THE FORTUNES OF NIGEL 15. PEVERIL OF THE PEAK . . . . . . . . 16. QUENTIN DURWARD 17. ST. RONAN'S WELL 18. REDGAUNTLET ....:... 19. THE BETROTHED, AND THE HIGHLAND WIDOW . 20.
Page 135 - These were so put into the brick lining (from the outer side) as to admit of their removal and renewal in a few minutes when they were worn out.
Page 138 - ... furnace with an equal charge of iron, and with the consumption of no other fuel than is contained in the crude iron.
Page 141 - Nor must it be forgotten that no amount of rolling will give to blister steel (although formed of rolled bars) the same homogeneous character that cast steel acquires by a mere extension of the ingot to some ten or twelve times its original length.
Page 146 - The air expanding in volume, divides itself into globules, or bursts violently upwards, carrying with it some hundredweight of fluid metal, which again falls into the boiling mass below. Every part of the apparatus trembles under the violent agitation thus produced, a roaring flame rushes from the mouth of the vessel, and as the process advances, it changes its violet colour to orange, and finally to a voluminous pure white flame.

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