A History of the McGuffey Readers (Google eBook)

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Burrows brothers Company, 1911 - 72 pages
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Contents

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Page 44 - Agree with thine adversary quickly while thou art in the way with him, lest at any time the adversary deliver thee to the judge, and the judge deliver thee to the officer, and thou be cast into prison,
Page 18 - American Indians," "Not many generations ago, where you now sit, encircled with all that exalts and embellishes civilized life, the rank thistle nodded in the wind, and the wild fox dug his hole
Page 18 - it is my living sentiment, and, by the blessing of God, it shall be my dying sentiment; independence now, and independence forever.
Page 17 - It must be confessed, it will be confessed; there is no refuge from confession but suicide, and suicide is confession;
Page 18 - swim, live or die, survive or perish; I give my hand and my heart to this vote.
Page 71 - Thousands of men and women owe their wholesome views of life, as well as whatever success they may have attained, to the wholesome maxims and precepts found on every page of these valuable books. The seed they scattered has yielded a million-fold. All honor to the name and memory of this excellent and useful man.
Page 3 - When we teach a child to read, our primary aim is not to enable it to decipher a way-bill or a receipt, but to kindle its imagination, enlarge its vision and open for it the avenues of knowledge.
Page 12 - books taught; and when we now remember, how even these moral memories have faded I cannot but wish the teachers had made us bound the States less, and solve fewer puzzles in 'position' and the 'cube root* and made us commit to memory the whole series of the
Page 2 - pupils. The school readers are the proper and indispensable texts for teaching true patriotism, integrity, honesty, industry, temperance, courage, politeness, and all other moral and intellectual virtues. In these books every lesson should have a distinct purpose in view. and the final aim should be to establish in the pupils high moral principles which are at the foundation of character.
Page 11 - Much as you may have studied the languages or the sciences, that which most affected you was the moral lessons in the series of McGuffey. And yet the reading class was filed out only once a day to read for a few moments, and then we were all

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