The Cambridge Companion to Native American Literature

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Joy Porter, Kenneth M. Roemer
Cambridge University Press, Jul 21, 2005 - Literary Criticism - 343 pages
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Invisible, marginal, expected - these words trace the path of recognition for American Indian literature written in English since the late eighteenth century. This Companion chronicles and celebrates that trajectory by defining relevant institutional, historical, cultural, and gender contexts, by outlining the variety of genres written since the 1770s, and also by focusing on significant authors who established a place for Native literature in literary canons in the 1970s (Momaday, Silko, Welch, Ortiz, Vizenor), achieved international recognition in the 1980s (Erdrich), and performance-celebrity status in the 1990s (Harjo and Alexie). In addition to the seventeen chapters written by respected experts - Native and non-Native; American, British and European scholars - the Companion includes bio-bibliographies of forty authors, maps, suggestions for further reading, and a timeline which details major works of Native American literature and mainstream American literature, as well as significant social, cultural and historical events. An essential overview of this powerful literature.
  

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The Cambridge companion to Native American literature

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A part of the highly esteemed Cambridge "Companion" series, this immensely rewarding volume is geared toward the serious student of Native American literature and explores genres written since the ... Read full review

Contents

literary historical and cultural conjunctions
25
Historical and cultural contexts to Native American literature
39
Translation and mediation
69
Women writers and gender issues
85
Nonfiction prose
105
Native American life writing
125
WILSON
145
Pre1968 fiction
161
becoming the bear
207
writing home
221
storyteller
245
Louise Erdrichs storied universe
271
irony intimacy and agency
297
Biobibliographies
311
Further reading 3 29
329
Copyright

American Indian theatre
189

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (2005)

Joy Porter is a lecturer in the Department of American Studies at the University of Wales, Swansea, where she teaches a range of courses on American and Native American history and literature. She is the author of To Be Indian: The Life of Seneca-Iroquois Arthur Caswell Parker, 1881-1955 (2002). Her work on Indian themes can be found in a variety of journals and books such as New York History and The State of US History (Berg 2002). Previously she was Senior Lecturer in American History at Anglia Polytechnic University, Cambridge, where she established a range of courses on Indian and American history. Her next book is Native American Freemasonry, the research for which was supported by a Leverhulme Research Fellowship.

Kenneth M. Roemer, an Academy of Distinguished Teachers Professor at the University of Texas at Arlington, has received four NEH grants to direct Summer seminars and has been a Visiting Professor in Japan, a guest lecturer at Harvard, and lectured in Vienna, Lisbon, Brazil, and Turkey. His articles have appeared in journals such as American Literature, American Literary History, and Modern Fiction Studies. His Approaches to Teaching Momaday's The Way to Rainy Mountain (ed.) was published by the MLA; his Native American Writers of the United States (ed.) won a Writer of Year Award from Wordcraft Circle. He has written four books on utopian literature, including The Obsolete Necessity and Utopian Audiences. His collection of personal narratives, verse, and photography about Japan is entitled Michibata de Deatta Nippon (A Sidewalker's Japan).

Bibliographic information