Citizenship Beyond the State

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SAGE, May 25, 2004 - Political Science - 192 pages
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Is 'citizenship' still a useful concept? Can citizens - and democracy - exist independently of the state?

This text provides an accessible guide to the theories and debates that surround the key political concepts of state, citizenship, and democracy today.

John Hoffman reviews the modern development of these concepts from the classic texts of Marx and Weber to the post-war critiques of the feminist, multicultural and critical theorists and considers the on-going barriers to a full realisation of a democratic citizenship.

By carefully considering what the state is and what it does, Hoffman shows that it is possible to respond to these critiques and challenges and 'reclaim' citizenship and democracy as inclusive and emancipatory, rather than divisive and controlling.

In advancing this alternative view of a 'stateless' citizenship, Hoffman opens up new possibilities for conceiving power and society in contemporary politics today. It will be essential reading for all students of politics and sociology for whom the questions of state, nationality, power and identity remain of central importance.

  

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Contents

The State
17
Democracy
32
PART TWO BARRIERS TO DEMOCRATIC CITIZENSHIP
47
Gender and Violence
64
Capitalism Class and Social Rights
79
Participation
98
Globalization
114
Citizenship Democracy and Emancipation
135
The Problem of Agency and Realization
154
Conclusion
173
Glossary
185
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

John Hoffman's career as a bona fide fringe writer began with the publication of his cult classic, The Art and Science of Dumpster Diving. His previous employment is equally checkered - he has worked as a psychiatric counselor, printer's assistant, security guard, pizza cook, soldier, activist, newspaper reporter, hotel clerk, apartment manager and city councilman. He is now studying for a law degree.

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