GarageBand: The Missing Manual

Front Cover
"O'Reilly Media, Inc.", 2004 - Computers - 253 pages
2 Reviews

GarageBand lets you create music of your very own. If you're already a musician, you'll probably flip over GarageBand; it combines the CD-quality samples of Apple's Soundtrack software with the hard-disk recording features of Digital Performer and the canned rhythm tracks of Band in a Box. But what's really mind-boggling is the way this program can turn the inspiration of musical novices into commercial-sounding demos. Imagine how many thousands of singers and instrumentalists, though blessed with enormous native talent, remain undiscovered because they lack recording studios and backup bands. For them, GarageBand may open a lot of doors--or just offer a lot of fun.

GarageBand: The Missing Manual is an authoritative, witty guide to constructing digital recordings with GarageBand.

  

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - incunabulum - LibraryThing

I'd already mucked about with GarageBand for awhile when I got this tome, so while it was helpful in areas, I'm the kind of computer guy who shuns a manual until absolute necessity is kicking me in ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Introduction
1
Building a Hit
7
Setting Up the Garage
9
Loops
27
Regions
47
Software Instruments MIDI
67
Editing Software Instrument Parts
87
Recording and Editing Live Audio
105
Effects Guitar Amps and Instrument Modules
119
Beyond the Garage
137
Mixing and Publishing
139
Advanced GarageBand
163
The Speed Chapter
175
Troubleshooting
187
Adding On Moving Up
195
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2004)

David Pogue, Yale '85, is the weekly personal-technology columnist for the New York Times and an Emmy award-winning tech correspondent for CBS News. His funny tech videos appear weekly on CNBC. And with 3 million books in print, he is also one of the world's bestselling how- to authors. He wrote or co-wrote seven books in the "For Dummies" series (including Macs, Magic, Opera, and Classical Music). In 1999, he launched his own series of amusing, practical, and user-friendly computer books called Missing Manuals, which now includes 100 titles.

Bibliographic information