Organizational Structure in American Police Agencies: Context, Complexity, and Control

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SUNY Press, Jan 9, 2003 - Political Science - 287 pages
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Although most large police organizations perform the same tasks, there is tremendous variation in how individual organizations are structured. To account for this variation, author Edward R. Maguire develops a new theory that attributes the formal structures of large municipal police agencies to the contexts in which they are embedded. This theory finds that the relevant features of an organizationís context are its size, age, technology, and environment. Using a database representing nearly four hundred of the nationís largest municipal police agencies, Maguire develops empirical measures of police organizations and their contexts and then uses these measures in a series of structural equation models designed to test the theory. Ultimately, police organizations are shown to be like other types of organizations in many ways but are also shown to be unique in a number of respects.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
What is Organizational Structure?
9
Explaining Organizational Structure
19
Police Organizational Structure
39
A Primitive Theory of Police Organizational Structure
69
Methodology and Descriptive Statistics
113
Testing the Theory
149
Summary and Conclusions
209
Notes
229
References
249
Name Index
273
Subject Index
279
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Edward R. Maguire is Associate Professor of Administration of Justice at George Mason University.

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