Horses, cattle, sheep and swine: Origin, history, improvement, description, characteristics, merits, objections, adaptability, etc., of each of the different breeds, with hints on selection, care and management, including methods of practical breeders in the United States and Canada ... (Google eBook)

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The Rural Publishing Company, 1893 - Technology & Engineering - 343 pages
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Page 260 - Whilst the dryness of the air, the moderate elevation of the land, and consequent mildness of the climate are all eminently favorable to the rearing of a race of down or mountain sheep, the contact of the cultivated country affords the means of supplying artificial food in due quantity. It is this combination of favorable circumstances which has rendered these calcareous hills capable of supporting a greater number of sheep than perhaps any tract of similar fertility in the country, and has afforded...
Page 22 - ... introduction of a Flemish horse. It is to the following effect: Some time between 1715 and 1720, John Paterson of Lochlyoch, on the estate and in the parish of Carmichael, grandson of one John Paterson who died at Lochlyoch in 1682, went to England and brought from thence a Flemish stallion, which is said to have so gradually improved the breed in the Upper Ward as to have made theVn noted all over Scotland.
Page 49 - Saintbel, a veterinary surgeon, whose investigations showed that his figure differed greatly from the conventional form which speculative writers had assigned as the standard of perfection. He was of an indomitable temper, and his jockeys found it in vain to attempt to hold him, but contented themselves with remaining still on the saddle while he swept along, his nose almost touching the ground. His full speed was not determined, since he never met with an opponent sufficiently fleet to put it to...
Page 83 - In order to define what constitutes a trotting-bred horse, and to establish a breed of trotters on a more intelligent basis, the following rules are adopted to control admission to the records of pedigrees. When an animal meets the requirements of admission, and is duly registered, it shall be accepted as a standard trotting-bred animal.
Page 240 - Convinced that this race of sheep, of which, I believe, not one had been brought to the United States until the importation by myself,-)- might be introduced with great benefit to our country, I contracted with a person, of the most respectable character, to deliver to me, at Lisbon, one hundred, composed of twenty-five rams and seventy-five ewes, from one to 'two years old. They were conducted with proper passports, across the country of Portugal, by three Spanish shepherds, and escorted by a small...
Page 315 - The standard of excellence as adopted is : head, short to medium in length, short in proportion to length of body; face somewhat dished and wide between the eyes; ears small, erect, in old animals often slightly pointed forward; neck short; shoulders broad and full ; hips broad ; body long, broad and deep ; hams broad, nearly straight with back, and running well down towards hock; legs long and slim, set well apart and supporting the body cm the toes; tail small and slim; hair fine, medium in thickness...
Page 270 - Head: size and shape, 5; ears and eyes, 3; color, 5; legs and feet, 2 15 Neck: shoulders and breast neck, 5; shoulders, 10; chest and breast, 15 30 Body: back and...
Page 324 - ... level, and straight from crest to tail, no falling off or down at tail ; hams wide and full, well rounded out, twist very wide and full all the way down ; legs small and very short, standing wide apart, in sows just keeping belly from the ground ; bone...
Page 83 - The progeny of a standard horse when out of a mare whose dam is a standard mare. NINTH. Any mare that has a record of 2:40 or better, and whose sire or dam. grandsire or grandam is a standard animal.
Page 266 - Head. Head short and broad; wide between the ears and between the eyes; short from top of head to tip of nose; ears short, of medium size; eyes expressive; head should be well covered with wool to a point even with the eyes, without any appearance of horns; color of face dark brown 10 points.

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