Emotional Longevity: What Really Determines How Long You Live

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Penguin, Feb 1, 2004 - Family & Relationships - 332 pages
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Based on a web of scientifically proven connections between biology on the one hand and social environment, beliefs, and emotions on the other, leading scientist Dr. Norman Anderson presents a fascinating new definition of health. Our ability to find meaning in adversity, our expectations about what the future will bring, and even our willingness to disclose our traumatic experiences all impact not only our emotional well-being but also our biology, influencing our vulnerability to everything from the common cold to heart disease. Through the stories of many prominent figures, including Maya Angelou, Reynolds Price, and Linda Ellerbee, Anderson underscores the reality of these scientific findings, providing an essential guide to living better and longer.

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Emotional longevity: what really determines how long you live

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The traditional model for promoting fitness focuses on genetics, diet, and exercise. In contrast, this book explores the burgeoning field of behavioral medicine for a general audience. Specifically ... Read full review

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A psychology book by far, but good for anyone to read, it helps you examine your life and decide how to live it! Read full review

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Contents

Expectations Explanations and Beliefs
15
Thoughts and Actions
61
Silence Secrets and Lies The High Price
69
Copyright

17 other sections not shown

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About the author (2004)

Norman B. Anderson, Ph.D., is currently Chief Executive O

Norman B. Anderson, Ph.D., is currently Chief Executive Officer of the American Psychological Association. Trained asfficer of the American Psychological Association. Trained as a practitioner and as a scientist, Dr. Anderson was Profess a practitioner and as a scientist, Dr. Anderson was Professor of Health and Social Behavior at the Harvard University Sor of Health and Social Behavior at the Harvard University School of Public Health before assuming his current position chool of Public Health before assuming his current position with the APA. Prior to his Harvard appointment, Anderson waswith the APA. Prior to his Harvard appointment, Anderson was the founding director of the Office of Behavioral and Socia the founding director of the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research and an Associate Director at the National Sciences Research and an Associate Director at the National Institutes of Health. During Dr. Anderson's tenure from 19l Institutes of Health. During Dr. Anderson's tenure from 1995 to 2000, OBSSR grew from a $2 million program to a $19 mi95 to 2000, OBSSR grew from a $2 million program to a $19 million program and organized the funding of more than $90 milllion program and organized the funding of more than $90 million in health research initiatives, including studies on calion in health research initiatives, including studies on cancer, heart disease, mental health, and diabetes. Dr. Andersncer, heart disease, mental health, and diabetes. Dr. Anderson's research interests lie at the intersection of health anon's research interests lie at the intersection of health and behavior and health and race. At Duke University, where hed behavior and health and race. At Duke University, where he was an associate professor in the departments of Psychiatry was an associate professor in the departments of Psychiatry and Psychology from 1985 to 1995, he conducted research stu and Psychology from 1985 to 1995, he conducted research studies on the role of stress in the development of hypertensiodies on the role of stress in the development of hypertension in African Americans and directed the NIH-funded Exploraton in African Americans and directed the NIH-funded Exploratory Center for Research on Health Promotion in Older Minoritiry Center for Research on Health Promotion in Older Minorities. As noted by APA President Dr. Philip G. Zimbardo upon Noes. As noted by APA President Dr. Philip G. Zimbardo upon Norman Anderson's appointment as CEO of APA, "His greatest strrman Anderson's appointment as CEO of APA, "His greatest strengths are his renaissance qualities as an educator-scientisengths are his renaissance qualities as an educator-scientist with clinical credentials and a public interest orientatiot with clinical credentials and a public interest orientation." Anderson is a past-president of the Society of Behavioran." Anderson is a past-president of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, the President of the Board of Directors of the Sl Medicine, the President of the Board of Directors of the Starbright Foundation and a member of the National Advisory Ctarbright Foundation and a member of the National Advisory Council of the National Institute of Drug Abuse at NIH. He isouncil of the National Institute of Drug Abuse at NIH. He is a graduate of the North Carolina Central University in Durh a graduate of the North Carolina Central University in Durham, NC, and earned master's and doctoral degrees in clinicalam, NC, and earned master's and doctoral degrees in clinical psychology from the University of North Carolina at Greensb psychology from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. He received additional clinical and research training aoro. He received additional clinical and research training at the Schools of Medicine at Brown and Duke Universities. t the Schools of Medicine at Brown and Duke Universities.

P. ELIZABETH ANDERSON is a national award-winning author and journalist with more than 17 years experience in clinical research and 30 years in activities to promote and protect companion animals. She has written for publications of Duke University Medical Center, the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the U.S. Public Health Service. Prior to writing this book, she was a writer and editor for the Humane Society of the United States. She co-authored an earlier book, Emotional Longevity, with her husband, Dr. Norman B. Anderson, CEO of the American Psychological Association.

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