The works of Christopher Marlowe [ed. by G. Robinson]. (Google eBook)

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Page 198 - Stand still, you ever-moving spheres of Heaven, That time may cease, and midnight never come; Fair Nature's eye, rise, rise again and make Perpetual day; or let this hour be but A year, a month, a week, a natural day, That Faustus may repent and save his soul! O lente, lente, currite noctis equi!
Page 136 - Mephistophilis, for love of thee, I cut mine arm, and with my proper blood Assure my soul to be great Lucifer's, Chief lord and regent of perpetual night!
Page 124 - Almain rutters with their horsemen's staves Or Lapland giants, trotting by our sides ; Sometimes like women or unwedded maids, Shadowing more beauty in their airy brows Than have the white breasts of the queen of love...
Page 199 - You stars that reign'd at my nativity, Whose influence hath allotted death and hell, Now draw up Faustus, like a foggy mist, Into the entrails of yon labouring clouds, That, when you vomit forth into the air, My limbs may issue from your smoky mouths, So that my soul may but ascend to heaven ! [The clock strikes the half-hour.] Ah, half the hour is past!
Page 200 - It strikes, it strikes ; now, body, turn to air, Or Lucifer will bear thee quick to Hell. [Thunder and lightning. O soul, be changed into little water-drops, And fall into the ocean : ne'er be found.
Page 107 - Tell Isabel the queen, I look'd not thus, When for her sake I ran at tilt in France, And there unhorsed the duke of Cleremont.
Page 107 - And there in mire and puddle have I stood This ten days' space ; and, lest that I should sleep, One plays continually upon a drum. They give me bread and water, being a king ; So that, for want of sleep and sustenance, My mind's distempered, and my body's numb'd, And whether I have limbs or no I know not.
Page 100 - Edwardum occidere nolite timere bonum est Kill not the king 'tis good to fear the worst. Unpointed as it is, thus shall it go, That, being dead, if it chance to be found, Matrevis and the rest may bear the blame, And we be quit that caused it to be done.
Page 194 - Though my heart pants and quivers to remember that I have been a student here these thirty years, O, would I had never seen Wittenberg, never read book ! And what wonders I have done, all Germany can witness, yea, all the world ; for which Faustus hath lost both Germany and the world, yea heaven itself, heaven, the seat of God, the throne of the blessed, the kingdom of joy; and must remain in hell for. ever, hell, ah, hell, for ever!
Page 88 - I might ! but heavens and earth conspire To make me miserable ! Here receive my crown ; Receive it ? no, these innocent hands of mine Shall not be guilty of so foul a crime.

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