Dreams from Bunker Hill (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Harper Collins, May 18, 2010 - Fiction - 152 pages
21 Reviews

My first collision with fame was hardly memorable. I was a busboy at Marx's Deli. The year was 1934. The place was Third and Hill, Los Angeles. I was twenty-one years old, living in a world bounded on the west by Bunker Hill, on the east by Los Angeles Street, on the south by Pershing Square, and on the north by Civic Center. I was a busboy nonpareil, with great verve and style for the profession, and though I was dreadfully underpaid (one dollar a day plus meals) I attracted considerable attention as I whirled from table to table, balancing a tray on one hand, and eliciting smiles from my customers. I had something else beside a waiter's skill to offer my patrons, for I was also a writer.

  

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Review: Dreams from Bunker Hill (The Saga of Arthur Bandini #4)

User Review  - Daniela Melis - Goodreads

After "the road to Los Angeles", "wait until spring, Bandini!" And "ask the dusk" I finish my love story with Bandini with this book. From the very beginning, I found it very different from the other ... Read full review

Review: Dreams from Bunker Hill (The Saga of Arthur Bandini #4)

User Review  - Matthew Sanchez - Goodreads

Seemingly every book that Fante wrote is worth reading. I only use the word seemingly because I still have a few to go. I admire his style and ability more and more with every book. I could write that ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
9
Section 2
15
Section 3
23
Section 4
31
Section 5
37
Section 6
43
Section 7
61
Section 8
69
Section 12
101
Section 13
105
Section 14
111
Section 15
115
Section 16
123
Section 17
125
Section 18
131
Section 19
133

Section 9
77
Section 10
87
Section 11
97
Section 20
139
Section 21
145
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

John Fante began writing in 1929 and published his first short story in 1932. His first novel, Wait Until Spring, Bandini, was published in 1938 and was the first of his Arturo Bandini series of novels, which also include The Road to Los Angeles and Ask the Dust. A prolific screenwriter, he was stricken with diabetes in 1955. Complications from the disease brought about his blindness in 1978 and, within two years, the amputation of both legs. He continued to write by dictation to his wife, Joyce, and published Dreams from Bunker Hill, the final installment of the Arturo Bandini series, in 1982. He died on May 8, 1983, at the age of seventy-four.

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