Edie: American Girl

Front Cover
Grove Press, 1982 - Biography & Autobiography - 455 pages
116 Reviews
When Edie was first published, it quickly became an international best-seller and then took its place among the classic books about the 1960s. Edie Sedgwick exploded into the public eye like a comet. She seemed to have it all: she was aristocratic and glamorous, vivacious and young, Andy Warhol's superstar. But within a few years she flared out as quickly as she had appeared, and before she turned twenty-nine she was dead from a drug overdose.

In a dazzling tapestry of voices?family, friends, lovers, rivals?the entire meteoric trajectory of Edie Sedgwick's life is brilliantly captured. And so is the Pop Art world of the ?60s: the sex, drugs, fashion, music?the mad rush for pleasure and fame. All glitter and flash on the outside, it was hollow and desperate within?like Edie herself, and like her mentor, Andy Warhol. Alternately mesmerizing, tragic, and horrifying, this book shattered many myths about the ?60s experience in America.
  

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Review: Edie: American Girl

User Review  - Katie Turkelson - Goodreads

Loved it. Read full review

Review: Edie: American Girl

User Review  - Jen - Goodreads

I found this book on my uncles's shelf back in the very early 80's. I asked to borrow it & he let me. I read it and became mesmerized. I found myself looking up everything and anything about Edie ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

I
iii
II
21
III
33
IV
42
V
50
VI
58
VII
63
VIII
75
XXIV
256
XXV
260
XXVI
269
XXVII
279
XXVIII
288
XXIX
295
XXX
303
XXXI
310

IX
82
X
93
XI
104
XII
119
XIII
135
XIV
142
XV
156
XVI
169
XVII
173
XVIII
179
XIX
184
XX
200
XXI
225
XXII
230
XXIII
243
XXXII
318
XXXIII
329
XXXIV
342
XXXV
348
XXXVI
354
XXXVII
361
XXXVIII
370
XXXIX
376
XL
381
XLI
388
XLII
401
XLIII
409
XLIV
419
XLV
424
Copyright

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About the author (1982)

George Ames Plimpton was born March 18, 1927. He was educated first at Phillips Exeter Academy in New Hampshire, and then spent four years at Harvard majoring in English and editing the Harvard Lampoon, followed by two at King's College, Cambridge. Before he left for Cambridge, he served as a tank driver in Italy for the U.S. Army from 1945 through 1948. After graduation, at about 27 years of age, Plimpton went with his friends to Paris. There they founded the Paris Review in 1953 and published poetry and short story writers and did interviews. In the '50s, Plimpton and staff came to New York, where they kept the Review going for half a century. The Review has published over 150 issues. Plimpton also served as a volunteer for Robert Kennedy's 1968 presidential run and was walking in front of him as the candidate was assassinated in the kitchen of a Los Angeles hotel. Plimpton was known as a "participatory journalist". In order to research his books and articles, he quarterbacked in a pre-season NFL game, pitched to several all-stars (retiring Willie Mays and Richie Ashburn) in an exhibition prior to Baseball's 1959 All-Star game, performed as a trapeze artist for the Clyde Beatty-Cole Brothers Circus, and fought boxers Archie Moore and Sugar Ray Robinson. Plimpton was alson known by the nickname the Prince of Cameos for the amount of work he did in films, playing small parts and screenwriting. He was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 2002. Within a month of the academy induction, the French made him a Chevalier, the Legion of Honor's highest rank. The Guild, an arts organization based on Long Island, gave him a lifetime achievement award. Plimpton was also a member of PEN; the Pyrotechnics Guild International; the National Football League Alumni Association; and the Mayflower Descendants Society. In 2003, Plimpton decided to write his memoirs, signing a $750,000 deal with Little, Brown and Co. Before he could finish, George Plimpton died, on September 26, 2003 of natural causes at the age of 76.

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