Samson Agonistes (Google eBook)

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Macmillan, 1867 - 189 pages
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Page 186 - Nothing is here for tears, nothing to wail Or knock the breast; no weakness, no contempt, Dispraise, or blame; nothing but well and fair, And what may quiet us in a death so noble.
Page 108 - It is not virtue, wisdom, valour, wit, Strength, comeliness of shape, or amplest merit That woman's love can win, or long inherit ; But what it is, hard is to say, Harder to hit, (Which way soever men refer it,) Much like thy riddle, Samson, in one day Or seven, though one should musing sit.
Page 74 - The angelic orders, and inferior creatures mute, Irrational and brute ? Nor do I name of men the common rout, That, wandering loose about, Grow up and perish, as the summer fly, Heads without name, no more remembered...
Page 14 - To daily fraud, contempt, abuse and wrong, Within doors, or without, still as a fool, In power of others, never in my own ; Scarce half I seem to live, dead more than half.
Page 6 - A little onward lend thy guiding hand To these dark steps, a little further on; For yonder bank hath choice of sun or shade; There I am wont to sit, when any chance Relieves me from my task of servile toil, Daily...
Page 178 - He tugged, he shook, till down they came, and drew The whole roof after them with burst of thunder Upon the heads of all who sat beneath, Lords, ladies, captains, counsellors, or priests, Their choice nobility and flower, not only Of this, but each Philistian city round, Met from all parts to solemnize this feast. Samson, with these immixed, inevitably Pulled down the same destruction on himself; The vulgar only scaped, who stood without.
Page 32 - But what more oft, in nations grown corrupt, And by their vices brought to servitude, Than to love bondage more than liberty Bondage with ease than strenuous liberty And to despise, or envy, or suspect, Whom God hath of his special favour raised As their deliverer?
Page 14 - And almost life itself, if it be true That light is in the soul, She all in every part, why was the sight To such a tender ball as the eye confined, So obvious and so easy to be quenched, And not, as feeling, through all parts diffused, That she might look at will through every pore?
Page 178 - As with the force of winds and waters pent, When mountains tremble, those two massy pillars With horrible convulsion to and fro He tugged, he shook, till down they came, and drew The whole roof after them, with burst of thunder Upon the heads of all who sat beneath, Lords, ladies, captains, counsellors...
Page 76 - Or to the unjust tribunals, under change of times, And condemnation of the ingrateful multitude. . If these they 'scape, perhaps in poverty With sickness and disease thou bow'st them down, Painful diseases and deform'd, In crude old age : Though not disordinate, yet causeless suffering The punishment of dissolute days : in fine, Just, or unjust, alike seem miserable, For oft alike both come to evil end.

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