Vegetable Seed Production

Front Cover
CABI, 2009 - Technology & Engineering - 320 pages
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Successful seed supplies are vital in maintaining vegetable production and availability, and for ensuring food security for many subsistence farmers in developing countries. Providing a broad and expert coverage of the horticultural production of vegetables grown from seed, this fully updated new edition includes new coverage of the production of genetically modified crops, organic seed production, packaging, and honey bee population, as well as updated references and further reading. It is an essential text for horticulturists, researchers, seed scientists, vegetable producers, students, technicians and practitioners in vegetable seed production in both developed and developing countries.
  

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Contents

1 Organization
1
2 Principles of Seed Production
37
3 Agronomy
50
4 Harvesting and Processing
75
5 Storage
91
6 Seed Handling Quality Control and Distribution
104
7 Chenopodiaceae
116
8 Asteraceae formerly Compositae
129
12 Solanaceae
202
13 Apiaceae formerly Umbelliferae
226
14 Alliaceae
251
15 Gramineae
264
16 Amaranthaceae and Malvaceae
270
Appendix 1
279
Appendix 2
281
References
283

9 Cruciferae
140
10 Cucurbitaceae
162
11 Leguminosae
181

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

Raymond A. T. George has spent a lifetime in agronomy specialising in seed production. Following four years at Cambridge University Botanic Garden he moved to the NVRS, Wellesbourne as an Experimental Officer in the Plant Breeding Section for seven years. He then worked as an Advisory Officer for four years prior a lecturing and research appointment in crop production at the University of Bath where he supervised a team of research postgraduates studying seed production. He was seconded to The UN FAO in 1976 and worked on seed projects in Asia. Following his return to Bath University he was appointed Senior Lecturer in Crop Production and also continued to make consultancy missions for FAO, mainly concerned with seed production in Africa, Asia, South Pacific and the Indian Sub-Continent. Following retirement from Bath he continued consultancy and editorial work for FAO's Seed Service until 2010. He continues to write on seed production and associated topics.

Bibliographic information