From Charter to Constitution: Being a Collection of Public Documents Pertaining to the Territory of the Northwest and the State of Ohio, from the Charters of James I, to and Including the First Constitution of Ohio, and the State Papers Relating to Its Admission to the Union, Showing Thereby the Historical Chain of Title of Said State from 1606 to 1803 (Google eBook)

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1897
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Page 73 - The legislatures of those districts or new States, shall never interfere with the primary disposal of the soil by the United States in Congress assembled, nor with any regulations Congress may find necessary for securing the title in such soil to the bona 284 fide purchasers. No tax shall be imposed on lands the property of the United States; and, in no case, shall nonresident proprietors be taxed higher than residents.
Page 148 - That all men have a natural and indefeasible right to worship Almighty God according to -the dictates of their own consciences ; that no man can, of right, be compelled to attend, erect, or support any place of worship, or to maintain any ministry against his consent; that no human authority can, in any case whatever, control or interfere with the rights of conscience ; and that no preference shall ever be given, by law, to any religious establishments or modes of worship.
Page 56 - The taxes for paying that proportion shall be laid and levied by the authority and direction of the Legislatures of the several States within the time agreed upon by the United States in Congress assembled.
Page 135 - Each house may determine the rules of its proceedings, punish its members for disorderly behavior, and, with the concurrence of two-thirds, expel a member, but not a second time for the same cause; and shall have all other powers necessary for a branch of the legislature of a free state.
Page 68 - There shall be formed in the said territory not less than three nor more than five States; and the boundaries of the States, as soon as Virginia shall alter her act of cession and...
Page 57 - And whenever any of the said States shall have sixty thousand free inhabitants therein, such State shall be admitted, by its delegates, into the Congress of the United States, on an equal footing with the original States, in all respects whatever; and shall be at liberty to form a permanent constitution and State government ; Provided, The constitution and government, so to be formed, shall be republican, and in conformity to the principles contained in these articles...
Page 56 - The said Territory and the States which may be formed therein shall forever remain a part of this Confederacy of the United States of America, subject to the Articles of Confederation and to such alterations therein as shall be constitutionally made, and to all the acts and ordinances of the United States in Congress assembled, conformable thereto.
Page 328 - Pennsylvania, and the said territorial line; provided however, and it is further understood and declared, that the boundaries of these three states shall be subject so far to be altered, that, if congress shall hereafter find it expedient, they shall have authority to form one or two states in that part of the said territory which lies north of an east and west line drawn through the southerly bend or extreme of lake Michigan.
Page 73 - There shall be reserved the lot No. 16, of every township, for the maintenance of public schools, within the said township...
Page 55 - Art. 2. The inhabitants of the said territory shall always be entitled to the benefits of the writ of Habeas Corpus, and of the trial by jury ; of a proportionate representation of the people in the legislature, and of judicial proceedings according to the course of the common law. All persons shall be bailable, unless for capital offences where the proof shall be evident, or the presumption great.

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