Analytical Psychology: Notes of the Seminar Given in 1925 (Google eBook)

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Princeton University Press, Jan 12, 2012 - Psychology - 200 pages
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For C. G. Jung, 1925 was a watershed year. He turned fifty, visited the Pueblo Indians of New Mexico and the tribesmen of East Africa, published his first book on the principles of analytical psychology meant for the lay public, and gave the first of his formal seminars in English. The seminar, conducted in weekly meetings during the spring and summer, began with a notably personal account of the development of his thinking from 1896 up to his break with Freud in 1912. It moved on to discussions of the basic tenets of analytical psychology--the collective unconscious, typology, the archetypes, and the anima/animus theory. In the elucidation of that theory, Jung analyzed in detail the symbolism in Rider Haggard's She and other novels. Besides these literary paradigms, he made use of case material, examples in the fine arts, and diagrams.

  

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Contents

23 March 1925
3
30 March 1925
9
6 April 1925
15
13 April 1925
26
20 April 1925
35
27 April 1925
43
4 May 1925
50
11 May 1925
58
1 June 1925
82
8 June 1925
91
15 June 1925
101
22 June 1925
111
29 June 1925
118
6 July 1925
122
ADDENDA Passages in Joan Corrie A B C of Jungs Psychology 1927
159
INDEXES
161

18 May 1925
65
25 May 1925
72
THE COLLECTED WORKS OF C G JUNG
173
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Carl Gustav Jung was born in Switzerland on July 26, 1875. He originally set out to study archaeology, but switched to medicine and began practicing psychiatry in Basel after receiving his degree from the University of Basel in 1902. He became one of the most famous of modern psychologists and psychiatrists. Jung first met Sigmund Freud in 1907 when he became his foremost associate and disciple. The break came with the publication of Jung's Psychology of the Unconscious (1912), which did not follow Freud's theories of the libido and the unconscious. Jung eventually rejected Freud's system of psychoanalysis for his own "analytic psychology." This emphasizes present conflicts rather than those from childhood; it also takes into account the conflict arising from what Jung called the "collective unconscious"---evolutionary and cultural factors determining individual development. Jung invented the association word test and contributed the word complex to psychology, and first described the "introvert" and "extrovert" types. His interest in the human psyche, past and present, led him to study mythology, alchemy, oriental religions and philosophies, and traditional peoples. Later he became interested in parapsychology and the occult. He thought that unidentified flying objects (UFOs) might be a psychological projection of modern people's anxieties. He wrote several books including Studies in Word Association, Flying Saucers: A Modern Myth of Things Seen in the Skies, and Psychology and Alchemy. He died on June 6, 1961 after a short illness.

Willie McGuire is a former professional footballer who plied his trade in Scotland from 1975 until 1992. During that time he fulfilled his boyhood ambition by playing for Airdrie, Falkirk, Partick Thistle and Dumbarton. But he also had another goal during those years. He wanted to write a book. Not your usual ex footballer's life story, but a mystery novel. He has now fulfilled his second boyhood dream.

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