The Sword in Anglo-Saxon England: Its Archaeology and Literature

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Boydell & Brewer Ltd, Jan 1, 1998 - History - 237 pages
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This book is an invaluable exploration of the significance of the sword as symbol and weapon in the Anglo-Saxon world, using archaeological and literary evidence. The first part of the book, a careful study of the disposition of swords found in peat bogs, in graves, lakes and rivers, yields information on religious and social practices. The second is concerned with literary sources, especially Beowulf.
  

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
THE MAKING OF THE SWORD
5
Iron for the Blade
15
Eastern Swordblades
20
Patternwelded Blades
23
When and Where were they Made?
30
The Teutonic Sword
36
Inscribed Blades
42
Scabbard Inscriptions
96
THE TELLING OF THE SWORD 1 Historical Records
104
AngloSaxon Wills
118
Some Sword Terms in Beowulf
121
The Sword Hrunting
129
The Sword from the Lake
135
Other Swords in AngloSaxon Poetry
142
Sword Riddles
152

The Construction of the Hilt
51
The Pommel
52
The Grip
58
The Guard
62
The Decoration of the Hilt
64
The Ring on the Hilt
71
Inscribed Hilts
77
Sword Attachments
82
The Scabbard
88
The Swordblade in Old Norse Literature
158
The Hilt in Old Norse Literature
177
The Scabbard in Old Norse Literature
186
THE USING OF THE SWORD
189
CONCLUSION
211
APPENDIX A The Forging of a Patternwelded Sword
217
INDEX
227
FURTHER REFERENCES
238
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

Davidson is formerly Vice President of Lucy Cavendish College, Cambridge and President of the London Folklore Society.

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