The Monthly Review ;or Literary Journal.VOLUME XXI. (Google eBook)

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Page 217 - In the worst inn's worst room, with mat half-hung, The floors of plaster, and the walls of dung, On once a flock-bed, but repair'd with straw, With tape-tied curtains, never meant to draw, The George and Garter dangling from that bed Where tawdry yellow strove with dirty red, Great Villiers lies alas!
Page 29 - ... his humanity, courtesy and affability was such, that he would have been thought to have been bred in the best courts, but that his good nature, charity and delight in doing good, and in communicating all he knew, exceeded that breeding.
Page 3 - ... weaker in degree, is not altogether unlike them. His agonies, when they are thus brought home to ourselves, when we have thus adopted and made them our own, begin at last to affect us, and we then tremble and shudder at the thought of what he feels.
Page 3 - By the imagination we place ourselves in his situation, we conceive ourselves enduring all the same torments, we enter as it were into his body, and become in some measure the same person with him, and thence form some idea of his sensations, and even feel something which, though weaker in degree, is not altogether unlike them.
Page 217 - Of mimic'd statesmen and their merry king. No wit to flatter left of all his store! No fool to laugh at, which he valued more. There, victor of his health, of fortune, friends, And fame, this lord of useless thousands ends.
Page 200 - Twas from the bottle King deriv'd his wit, Drank till he could not talk, and then he writ. Let no coiPd ferjeant touch the facred juice, But leave it to the bards for better ufe : Let the grave judges too the glafs forbear, Who never fing and dance but once a year. This truth once known, our poets take the hint...
Page 29 - ... the attainder of his father. He was a man of a very extraordinary person and presence, which drew the eyes of all men upon him, which were more fixed by a wonderful graceful behaviour, a flowing courtesy and civility, and such a volubility of language, as surprised and delighted...
Page 31 - There needs no more be said to extol the excellence and power of his wit, and pleasantness of his conversation, than that it was of magnitude enough to cover a world of very great faults ; that is, so to cover them, that they were not taken notice of to his reproach, viz. a narrowness in his nature to...
Page 29 - London, and in the parliament, after they were in rebellion, and in the worst times, which his age obliged him to do; and how wicked soever the actions were which were every day done, he was confident he had not given his...
Page 29 - Hyde was wont to say that he valued himself upon nothing more than upon having had Mr. Selden's acquaintance from the time he was very young...

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