The Lay of the Last Minstrel (Google eBook)

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Houghton, Mifflin, 1886 - 241 pages
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Review: The Lay of the Last Minstrel 1805 (Revolution and Romanticism, 1789-1834)

User Review  - Christina Marie Rau - Goodreads

(After having finally finished setting up my online course for Early British Literature....) The rhythm and images that weave this tale don't allow for pause. They push forward in a sing-song to tell ... Read full review

Review: The Lay of the Last Minstrel 1805 (Revolution and Romanticism, 1789-1834)

User Review  - Sarah Asarnow - Goodreads

Mentioned in Peter Wimsey #2 Clouds of Witness. Read full review

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Page 127 - That day of wrath, .that dreadful day, When heaven and earth shall pass away, What power shall be the sinner's stay ? How shall he meet that dreadful day ? When, shrivelling like a parched scroll, The flaming heavens together roll ; When louder yet, and yet more dread, Swells the high trump that wakes the dead ! Oh ! on that day, that wrathful day, When man to judgment wakes from clay, Be THOU the trembling sinner's stay, Though heaven and earth shall pass away ! HUSH'D is the harp the Minstrel...
Page 96 - True love's the gift which God has given To man alone beneath the heaven : It is not fantasy's hot fire, Whose wishes, soon as granted, fly ; It liveth not in fierce desire, With dead desire it doth not die ; It is the secret sympathy, The silver link, the silken tie, Which heart to heart, and mind to mind, In body and in soul can bind.
Page 122 - Clair. There are twenty of Roslin's barons bold Lie buried within that proud chapelle; Each one the holy vault doth hold But the sea holds lovely Rosabelle! And each Saint Clair was buried there With candle, with book, and with knell; But the sea-caves rung, and the wild winds sung The dirge of lovely Rosabelle.
Page 120 - The blackening wave is edged with white : To inch and rock the sea-mews fly ; The fishers have heard the Water-Sprite, Whose screams forbode that wreck is nigh.
Page 23 - In Eske or Liddel fords were none But he would ride them, one by one ; Alike to him was time or tide, December's snow or July's pride ; Alike to him was tide or time, Moonless midnight or matin prime : Steady of heart and stout of hand As ever drove prey from Cumberland ; Five times outlawed had he been By England's king and Scotland's queen.
Page 108 - O Caledonia ! stern and wild, Meet nurse for a poetic child ! Land of brown heath and shaggy wood, Land of the mountain and the flood, Land of my sires ! what mortal hand Can e'er untie the filial band, That knits me to thy rugged strand...
Page 34 - The moon on the east oriel shone Through slender shafts of shapely stone, By foliaged tracery combined; Thou wouldst have thought some fairy's hand 'Twixt poplars straight the osier wand In many a freakish knot had twined; Then framed a spell, when the work was done, And changed the willow wreaths to stone.
Page 159 - A thousand fantasies Begin to throng into my memory, Of calling shapes and beckoning shadows dire, And airy tongues that syllable men's names On sands and shores and desert wildernesses.
Page 188 - His fellow's winded horn not one of them but knew, When setting to their lips their little bugles shrill, The warbling echoes waked from every dale and hill: Their baldrics set with studs, athwart their shoulders cast, To which under their arms their sheafs were buckled fast, A short sword at their belt, a buckler scarce a span, Who struck below the knee, not counted then a man : All made of Spanish yew, their bows were wondrous strong ; They not an arrow drew but was a cloth-yard long. Of archery...
Page 107 - BREATHES there the man, with soul so dead, Who never to himself hath said, This is my own, my native land ? Whose heart hath ne'er within him burned, As home his footsteps he hath turned From wandering on a foreign strand?

References from web pages

The Nineteenth Century: Romantic Period
Walter Scott's The Lay of the Last Minstrel (1805), but also including Cole-. ridge's Condones ad populum (1795), Wordsworth's Peter Bell (1819), John ...
ywes.oxfordjournals.org/ cgi/ reprint/ 73/ 1/ 336.pdf

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