Proceedings of the Suffolk Institute of Archaeology, Volume 4 (Google eBook)

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Page 34 - ... a seasonable argument to persuade all the grand juries in England to petition for a new parliament.
Page 292 - ... creek were in every respect equal to those exhumed from the mounds of the Mississippi valley, and Dr. Davis himself, who examined my specimens from the first-named locality, expressed the same opinion. One of the methods employed by the Indians in the manufacture of earthenware was, to weave baskets of rushes or willows, similar in shape to the vessels they intended to make, and to coat the inside of these baskets with clay to the required thickness; the baskets, after being destroyed by the...
Page 305 - This proves that the kingdom was then generally divided into parishes; which division happened probably not -all at once, but by degrees. For it seems pretty clear and certain, that the boundaries of parishes were originally ascertained by those of a manor or manors : since it very seldom happens that a manor extends itself over more parishes than one, though there are often many manors in one parish.
Page 292 - After having amassed the proper kind of clay and carefully cleaned it, the Indian women take shells which they pound and reduce to a fine powder; they mix this powder with the clay, and having poured some water on the mass, they knead it with their hands and feet, and make it into a paste, of which they form rolls six or seven feet long and of a thickness suitable to their purpose. If they intend to fashion a plate or a vase, they take hold of one of these rolls by the end, and fixing here with the...
Page 119 - I thank you for the patience with which you have listened to me, and on which I have unwillingly trespassed so long.
Page 433 - Some men make it a Case of Conscience, whether a Man may have a Pigeon-house, because his Pigeons eat other Folks' Corn. But there is no such thing as Conscience in the Business ; the Matter is, whether he be a Man of such Quality, that the State allows him to have a Dove-house ; if so, there's an end of the business ; his Pigeons have a right to eat where they please themselves.
Page 384 - Edmund, drawn thither by his vow and by devotion. We, indeed, believed that he was come to make offering of some great matter ; but all he offered was one silken cloth, which his servants had borrowed from our sacrist, and to this day have not paid for. He availed himself of the hospitality of St. Edmund, which was attended with enormous expense, and upon his departure bestowed nothing at all, either of honour or profit, upon the saint, save thirteen pence sterling, which he offered at his mass on...
Page 389 - In the year of grace one thousand one hundred and ninety-eight, the glorious martyr Edmund was pleased to strike terror into our convent, and to instruct us that his body should be kept more reverently and observantly than it had hitherto been. Now there was a certain flooring between the shrine and the altar whereupon two tapers, which the keepers of the shrine used to join together, by placing one upon the other in a slovenly manner, stood ; and under that flooring there were many things irreverently...
Page 272 - B chamber contained urns, and other article) of the ordinary funereal deposits. It is not at all likely that any Roman building should be standing above ground in this country, with a tiled roof laid over it 1500 years ago. Another feature in this chamber, of peculiar interest to myself, was the arched vaulting, a mode of construction, of which, I believe, there are very few examples among us which can positively be assigned to the Romans so few, indeed, that, at one time, it was imagined that...
Page 277 - This proves to be a mass of a peculiar kind of fungus, called liliizomorpha, and serves to illustrate the fact, that all fungi are derived from the decomposing materials of some previously organized body, whether animal or vegetable. Here we have the substance of one of the nobles of antiquity converted into materials forming one of the very lowest of the fungi ! The leaden chest or coffin was six feet nine inches in length, one foot five inches broad, and one foot four inches deep. It had been formed...

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