Quality Software Management: Systems thinking, Volume 1

Front Cover
Dorset House Pub., 1992 - Computers - 318 pages
0 Reviews
In the first of three volumes about quality, management, and productivity, Weinberg discusses software development organizations in terms of their culture, and he observes the patterns of their behavior. Organizations can be classified as one of six cultural patterns, ranging from Pattern One (obvio

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Software Subcultures
16
Patterns of Managing
51
Making Explicit Management Models
71
Copyright

16 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1992)

I've always been interested in helping smart people be happy and productive. To that end, I've published books on human behavior, including Weinberg on Writing: The Fieldstone Method, The Psychology of Computer Programming, Perfect Software and Other Fallacies, and an Introduction to General Systems Thinking. I've also written books on leadership including Becoming a Technical Leader, The Secrets of Consulting (Foreword by Virginia Satir), More Secrets of Consulting, and the nine-volume Quality Software series. I try to incorporate my knowledge of science, engineering, and human behavior into all of my writing and consulting work (with writers, hi-tech researchers, software engineers, and people whose life-situation could require the use of a service dog). I write novels about such people, including The Aremac Project, Aremac Power, Jigglers, First Stringers, Second Stringers, The Hands of God, Freshman Murders, Earth's Endless Effort, Mistress of Molecules, Where There's a Will There's a Murder, The Death Lottery-all about how my brilliant protagonists produce quality work and learn to be happy. My books may be found linked from my website: geraldmweinberg.com. I've won many awards for my writing but the "award" I'm most proud of is the book, The Gift of Time (Fiona Charles, ed.) written by my student and readers for my 75th birthday. Their stories of our interactions make me feel that I've been at least partially successful at helping smart people be happy. - Gerald M. (Jerry) Weinberg

Bibliographic information