Train to Pakistan

Front Cover
Grove Press, 1990 - Fiction - 181 pages
296 Reviews
“In the summer of 1947, when the creation of the state of Pakistan was formally announced, ten million people—Muslims and Hindus and Sikhs—were in flight. By the time the monsoon broke, almost a million of them were dead, and all of northern India was in arms, in terror, or in hiding. The only remaining oases of peace were a scatter of little villages lost in the remote reaches of the frontier. One of these villages was Mano Majra.”

It is a place, Khushwant Singh goes on to tell us at the beginning of this classic novel, where Sikhs and Muslims have lived together in peace for hundreds of years. Then one day, at the end of the summer, the “ghost train” arrives, a silent, incredible funeral train loaded with the bodies of thousands of refugees, bringing the village its first taste of the horrors of the civil war. Train to Pakistan is the story of this isolated village that is plunged into the abyss of religious hate. It is also the story of a Sikh boy and a Muslim girl whose love endured and transcends the ravages of war.
  

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Nice book Very sensitive writing - Goodreads
Ending is disappointing though... - Goodreads
In 190 pages, the book is easy to read. - Goodreads
picks pace and is interesting only towards the end. - Goodreads
It gave me insight to the mood post partition. - Goodreads
Ending could have been better. - Goodreads

Disappointed

User Review  - Mani - Flipkart

Had very high expectations. The story built itself fine but the ending came all so sudden. Iqbal seemed to be an important character but in the end he had no role altogether Read full review

Review: Train to Pakistan

User Review  - Ajit Pal - Goodreads

A must read book from legendary late Khushwant Singh. Read full review

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About the author (1990)

Khushwant Singh was born on February 2, 1915 in the village of Hadali in what is now the Punjab province of Pakistan. He attended St. Stephen's College in Delhi, Government College in Lahore, and King's College London. In 1947, he worked for India's ministry of external affairs and served as press officer in Ottawa and London. From 1980 to 1986, he was a member of the upper house of the Indian parliament. He was an author and journalist. His newspaper column, With Malice Towards One and All, was syndicated all over India. During his lifetime, he wrote more than 100 novels and short-story collections including Train to Pakistan, I Shall Not Hear the Nightingale, Delhi: A Novel, The Company of Women, and The Sunset Club. He also wrote a two-volume History of the Sikhs, an autobiography entitled Truth, Love and a Little Malice, and a book of biographical profiles entitled The Good, the Bad and the Ridiculous. He died on March 20, 2014 at the age of 99.

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