The Wheels of Chance: A Bicycling Idyll (Google eBook)

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pubOne info LLC, Sep 15, 2010 - Fiction - 215 pages
10 Reviews
pubOne.info thank you for your continued support and wish to present you this new edition. If you (presuming you are of the sex that does such things) - if you had gone into the Drapery Emporium - which is really only magnificent for shop - of Messrs. Antrobus & Co. - a perfectly fictitious -Co., - by the bye - of Putney, on the 14th of August, 1895, had turned to the right-hand side, where the blocks of white linen and piles of blankets rise up to the rail from which the pink and blue prints depend, you might have been served by the central figure of this story that is now beginning. He would have come forward, bowing and swaying, he would have extended two hands with largish knuckles and enormous cuffs over the counter, and he would have asked you, protruding a pointed chin and without the slightest anticipation of pleasure in his manner, what he might have the pleasure of showing you. Under certain circumstances - as, for instance, hats, baby linen, gloves, silks, lace, or curtains - he would simply have bowed politely, and with a drooping expression, and making a kind of circular sweep, invited you to -step this way, - and so led you beyond his ken; but under other and happier conditions, - huckaback, blankets, dimity, cretonne, linen, calico, are cases in point, - he would have requested you to take a seat, emphasising the hospitality by leaning over the counter and gripping a chair back in a spasmodic manner, and so proceeded to obtain, unfold, and exhibit his goods for your consideratio
  

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Review: The Wheels of Chance: A Bicycling Idyll

User Review  - Tina Rust - Goodreads

Loved it. And I guess I'm not surprised by the ending, given the time period it was written. Read full review

Review: The Wheels of Chance: A Bicycling Idyll

User Review  - Jason - Goodreads

A fun story! Being an avid bicyclist brought this book a little closer to home. Makes me appreciate how much easier bicycling is today. Read full review

Contents

XXI
XXII
XXIII
THE MOONLIGHT RIDE
XXIV
XXV
THE SURBITON INTERLUDE
XXVI

VI
VII
VIII
HOW MR HOOPDRIVER WAS HAUNTED
IX
THE IMAGININGS OF MR HOOPDRIVERS HEART
X
OMISSIONS
XI
THE DREAMS OF MR HOOPDRIVER
XII
HOW MR HOOPDRIVER WENT TO HASLEMERE
XIII
HOW MR HOOPDRIVER REACHED MIDHURST
XIV
AN INTERLUDE
XV
OF THE ARTIFICIAL IN MAN AND OF THE ZEITGEIST
XVI
THE ENCOUNTER AT MIDHURST
XVII
XVIII
XIX
THE PURSUIT
XX
AT BOGNOR
THE AWAKENING OF MR HOOPDRIVER
XXVII
THE DEPARTURE FROM CHICHESTER
XXVIII
THE UNEXPECTED ANECDOTE OF THE LION
XXIX
THE RESCUE EXPEDITION
XXX
XXXI
MR HOOPDRIVER KNIGHT ERRANT
XXXII
THE ABASEMENT OF MR HOOPDRIVER
XXXIII
XXXIV
XXXV
XXXVI
IN THE NEW FOREST
XXXVII
AT THE RUFUS STONE
XXXVIII
XXXIX
XL
THE ENVOY
XLI
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

H.G. Wells was born in Bromley, England, the son of an unsuccessful merchant. After a limited education, he was apprenticed to a dry-goods merchant, but soon found he wanted something more out of life. He read widely and got a position as a student assistant in a secondary school, eventually winning a scholarship to the College of Science in South Kensington, where he studied biology under the British biologist and educator, Thomas Henry Huxley. After graduating, Wells took several different teaching positions and began writing for magazines. When his stories began to sell, he left teaching to write full time. Wells's first major novel, The Time Machine (1895), launched his career as a writer, and he began to produce a steady stream of science-fiction tales, short stories, realistic novels, and books of sociology, history, science, and biography, producing one or more books a year. Much of Wells's work is forward-looking, peering into the future of prophesy social and scientific developments, sometimes with amazing accuracy. Along with French writer Jules Verne, Wells is credited with popularizing science fiction, and such novels as The Time Machine and The War of the Worlds (1898) are still widely read. Many of Wells's stories are based on his own experiences. The History of Mr. Polly (1910) draws on the life of Wells's father. Kipps (1905) uses Wells's experience as an apprentice, and Love and Mr. Lewisham (1900) draws on Wells's experiences as a school teacher. Wells also wrote stories showing how the world could be a better place. One such story is A Modern Utopia (1905). As a writer, Wells's range was exceptionally wide and his imagination extremely fertile. While time may have caught up with him (many of the things he predicted have already come to pass), he remains an interesting writer because of his ability to tell a lively tale.

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