Remembering Mr. Shawn's New Yorker: The Invisible Art of Editing

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Overlook Press, 1998 - Biography & Autobiography - 414 pages
9 Reviews
For more than three decades, a quiet man - some would say almost an invisible man - dwelt at the center of American journalistic and literary life. He was William Shawn, the editor-in-chief of "The New Yorker" from 1952 to 1987. In "Remembering Mr. Shawn's New Yorker," Mr. Mehta, who started writing for "The New Yorker" at the age of twenty-five, and over some thirty-three years contributed such historic pieces as his brilliant study of philosophers at Oxford, and who was a friend of Shawn and his family, gives us the closest, most careful, and most refined description that has yet been written of Shawn's editorship of the magazine. As Mr. Mehta pulls back the curtain, we see the workings of "The New Yorker" behind the scenes. The book will give intense pleasure to all who love reading and writing, for it is at once a tribute to William Shawn, a close look at the relationship between writer and editor, and a joyful homage to the inextricably linked arts of editing, writing, and reading.

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Review: Remembering Mr. Shawn's New Yorker: The Invisible Art of Editing

User Review  - Juliana - Goodreads

The taxi whizzed up Fifth Avenue, which was then a two-way. I was so exhausted that I could barely find my tongue, but after a while I said stupidly, "I hope someone will read the piece." "I'll be ... Read full review

Review: Remembering Mr. Shawn's New Yorker: The Invisible Art of Editing

User Review  - Joan Stewart - Goodreads

"We have done our work with honesty and love, editor William Shawn consoled his grieving staff on his last day, having been abruptly fired from The New Yorker by its brash new corporate owner in 1987 ... Read full review

Contents

A STORY IN THE NEW YORKER
3
THE SIGHTED BOOK 143
43
FROM ELIOT HOUSE TO THE PICASSO I
63
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

Ved Mehta, a native of Lahore, India, has been blind since childhood. He received his B.A. from Balliol College, Oxford and his M.A. from Harvard University in 1961. He has been on staff at the New Yorker magazine since 1961 and has written numerous articles on life in 20th-century India. A prolific author of more than 20 books and essay collections, Mehta's works include "Face to Face," "Walking the Indian Streets" and "Remembering Mr. Shawn's New Yorker: The Invisible Art of Editing.

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