The Influence of Sea Power Upon History, 1660-1783

Front Cover
Courier Dover Publications, 1894 - History - 557 pages
17 Reviews
The definite object proposed in this work is an examination of the general history of Europe and America with particular reference to the effect of sea power upon the course of that history. Historians generally have been unfamiliar with the conditions of the sea, having as to it neither special interest nor special knowledge; and the profound determining influence of maritime strength upon great issues has consequently been overlooked. This is even more true of particular occasions than of the general tendency of sea power. It is easy to say in a general way, that the use and control of the sea is and has been a great factor in the history of the world; it is more troublesome to seek out and show its exact bearing at a particular juncture. Yet, unless this be done, the acknowledgment of general importance remains vague and unsubstantial; not resting, as it should, upon a collection of special instances in which the precise effect has been made clear, by an analysis of the conditions at the given moments. -- from Preface (p. [iii]).
  

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Review: The Influence Of Sea Power Upon History, 1660 - 1783

User Review  - Rahul Adusumilli Adusumilli - Goodreads

The book that caused the first world war! (by some accounts) Read full review

Review: The Influence Of Sea Power Upon History, 1660 - 1783

User Review  - Rahul Adusumilli - Goodreads

The book that caused the first world war! (by some accounts) Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTORY
1
Lessons of history apply especially to strategy
7
pt 3 1782
11
General conditions affecting Sea Power
13
The English besiege Bnssy in Cuddalore by land and
20
Naval strategic combinations surer now than formerly
22
Development of colonies and colonial posts
28
Failure of the Spanish line of the House of Austria
64
Clivein India
305
Ruined condition of the French navy
311
Spain sues for peace
317
Results of the maritime war
323
Mutual dependence of seaports and fleets
329
Genoa cedes Corsica to France
334
Strength of English navy _
341
Vital importance of the French fleet to the American
347

Influence of colonies on Sea Power
82
CHAPTER II
90
Condition of the Dutch United Provinces
96
Conditions of other European States
102
Second AngloDutch Var 1665
107
The order of battle for sailingships
115
by the some capital are simultaneous
119
Military merits of the opposing fleets
126
Ruyter in the Thames 1667
132
CHAPTER III
139
Tactical combinations of De Ruyter _
145
Termsofthepeace
148
Land campaign of the French in Holland
149
Effect upon the general war
154
Peace between England and the United Provinces
158
Illustration of Clerks naval tacties
163
Efiects of the war on France and Holland
169
Accession of James II
175
lands in Ireland
181
Battle of the Boyne 1690
186
Attack and defence of commerce
193
ro 1711
202
Regency of Philip of Orleans
233
Failure and dismissal of Alberoni
239
English contraband trade in Spanish America
245
Decay of the French navy
252
Neglect of the navy by French government
254
Dupleix and La Bourdonnais in India
258
Influence of Sea Power on the war
264
Courtsmartial following the action
268
Influence of Sea Power in Indian affairs
275
He is recalled from India
282
Objectives of the allied operations in Europe
286
Byng returns to Gibraltar
290
English plans for the general naval operations
296
Hawke falls in with it and disperses it 1759
302
Battle of Ushaut 1778
351
CHAPTER X
359
DEstaing sails for the West Indies
365
Ineffectual attempts of DEstaing to dislodge them 866
367
Reasons for his neglect
371
Rodney arrives to command English fleet
377
Rodney and De Guichen April 17 1780
378
Subsequent movements of Rodney and De Guichen
381
French fleet returns to Newport
387
3
394
The allied fleets assemble at Algesiras
400
Snffren at Porto Praya 1781
423
Decisive character of Suffreifs action
427
Suffren and Hughes February 17 1782
431
Suffren and Hughes April 12 1782
438
Suffren and Hughes July 6 1782
447
Suffren and Hughes September 3 1782
454
News of the peace received at Madras
463
De Grasse sails for the islands
469
Hood and De Grasse January 1782
470
Hood seizes the anchorage left by De Grasse
473
Rodney arrives in West Indies from England
479
Criticism upon the action
483
Rodney breaks the French line 433
489
Lessons of this short naval campaign
495
Examination of his reasons and of the actual conditions
497
De Grasse appeals against the finding
503
Foundations of the British Empire of the seas
510
The bases abroad generally deficient in resources
519
England upon the defensive in 1778
523
Effect on the navy of the failure to fortify naval bases
529
Naval policy of the allies
535
INDrsx
543
Death of George II 304
553
Copyright

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About the author (1894)

The greatest U.S. military historian and one of the most influential of all nineteenth-century historians, Alfred Thayer Mahan was the son of an instructor at West Point. The younger Mahan, however, attended Annapolis and embarked on a naval career seeing duty in the South Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico against the Confederacy. He taught briefly at Annapolis, but spent most of his academic career at the newly founded Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island, where he eventually served as president. His lectures at the college formed the basis for his two major works, "The Influence of Sea Power upon History, 1660--1783," published in 1890, and "The Influence of Sea Power upon the French Revolution and Empire, 1793--1812," published two years later. These works attributed the dominance of Great Britain in world politics during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries to its invincible navy. His ideas were picked up by Theodore Roosevelt in the United States, by Admiral von Tirpitz in Germany, and by Admiral Togo in Japan, and used to justify the building of large U.S., German, and Japanese fleets. Indeed, Mahan was assigned some of the blame for the naval race before World War I. Mahan wrote other books on sea power as well as biographies of Horatio Nelson and David Farragut. He was a founder of the Navy League and fought throughout his life for a Panama Canal.

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