The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 8 (Google eBook)

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Publication Fund of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1884 - Pennsylvania
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Page 277 - THROUGH all the changing scenes of life, In trouble and in joy, The praises of my God shall still My heart and tongue employ.
Page 438 - Lord one thousand seven hundred and eight, and in the seventh year of the reign of our Sovereign Lady Anne, by the Grace of God. of Great Britain, France and Ireland, Queen, Defender of the faith, etc.
Page 3 - The very garments of a Quaker seem incapable of receiving a soil ; and cleanliness in them to be something more than the absence of its contrary. Every Quakeress is a lily ; and when they come up in bands to their Whitsun conferences, whitening the easterly streets of the metropolis, from all parts of the United Kingdom, they show like troops of the Shining Ones.
Page 426 - But the Tide was too strong against us. The nation was provoked by American Claims of Independence, and all Parties joined in resolving by this act to settle the point.
Page 258 - BEFORE you receive this letter," writes Washington to his brother Augustine, " you will undoubtedly have heard of the captivity of General Lee. This is an additional misfortune ; and the more vexatious, as it was by his own folly and imprudence, and without a view to effect any good that he was taken.
Page 207 - ... us, who are under no such restraint, some of whom have been disciplined in the art of war, and conscientiously think it their duty to fight in defence of their country, their wives, their families, and estates...
Page 433 - John Filson, the first historian of Kentucky: An account of his life and writings, principally from original sources. Prepared for The Filson Club and read at its meeting in Louisville, Kentucky, June 26, 1884, by Reuben T. Durrett, AM, LL.D., President of the Club.
Page 205 - in honor and remembrance of their ancient chief) and as the greatest mark of respect which they could show to that gentleman, who they said had the same address, affability and meekness as their honored chief.
Page 258 - Before you receive this letter, you will undoubtedly have heard of the captivity of General Lee. This is an additional misfortune, and the more vexatious, as it was by his own folly and imprudence, and without a view to effect any good, that he was taken. As he went to lodge three miles out of his own camp, and within twenty of the enemy, a rascally Tory rode in the night to give notice of it to the enemy, who sent a party of lighthorse that seized him, and carried him off, with every mark of triumph...
Page 226 - The dishes were placed all around, and there was an elegant variety of roast beef, veal, turkeys, ducks, fowls, hams, &c.; puddings, jellies, oranges, apples, nuts, almonds, figs, raisins, and a variety of wines and punch. We took our leave at six, more than an hour after the candles were introduced. No lady but Mrs. Washington dined with us. We were waited on by four or five men servants dressed in livery.

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